Sunday, July 10, 2011

Entrust PKI Authorities - Insiders Of The Governor General of Canada's Office - 'Taliban Great Escape' Coordination - Betrayal Of Nation States

To whom it may concern

July 10, 2011

Did Harper betray five nation states with Entrust Taliban great escapes?

Abel Danger believes that Crown Agents Sister Laureen Harper procured Entrust PKI authorities for use by insiders of the Governor General of Canada’s office to coordinate the ‘Taliban Great Escapes’ of 2008 and 2010 and betrayed five of the key counter-insurgency Nation States – Afghanistan itself, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia and the United States – whose soldiers would subsequently be murdered by the escapees.

Check #59
Abel Danger Mischief Makers - Mistress of the Revels - 'Man-In-The-Middle' Attacks


Entrust(ed) witting root authorities for Taliban Great Escapes

2008 Taliban Great Escape watched by Entrust(ed) mentors hired by Correctional Service of Canada

Duh! Russell Williams, the homicidal pedophile EW 911 pilot, was hired and Entrust(ed) with Olympic Airborne Security.




2010 Taliban Great Escape watched by Entrust(ed) mentors hired by Correctional Service of Canada

Entrust(ed) unwitting root authorities for Taliban Great Escapes

[Evidence of misprision of treason; during the 2008 and 2010 Taliban Great Escapes, Canadian Privy Councilors used Entrust Public Key Infrastructure – developed with root authority provided through the office of the Governor General of Canada – to task the Special Operating Agency, Correctional Service Canada] A successful escapee bragged of the ease of their escape and the failure of prison guards to notice which will raise questions about discipline among staff and the training they received from Canadian 'mentors.' "They were just sleeping," he claimed. "They are always intoxicated, smoking heroin, smoking hashish, or sleeping." He will now rejoin the insurgency, he said. "I have been doing jihad for 10 years. I will fight again, I will fight again!"”


[Evidence of misprision of treason; during the 2008 and 2010 Taliban Great Escapes, Canadian Privy Councilors used Entrust Public Key Infrastructure – developed with root authority provided through the office of the Governor General of Canada – to task the Special Operating Agency, Correctional Service Canada] The Taliban’s Great Escape by Joshua Foust on 4/25/2011 · 16 comments In 2008, there was a massive prison break in Kandahar. Something like 900 inmates escaped, most of whom were Taliban figures. The Canadians came in for particular blame here, as they took two hours to arrive at the prison after the breakout occurred, and were accused of refusing to re-capture the prisoners while watching the prisoners flee. Eventually, the prisoners of Sarpoza fled to the Arghandab—this was when the ARV was pretty quiet and Kandaharis went there on vacation—and sparked an epic battle for control of the area after the Taliban seized something like eighteen separate towns in the area. Of course, NATO was never able to dislodge the Taliban from the area. And I’m not even sure what happened to most of the escapees, though I do know quite a few were recaptured. Anyway, I think they escaped again? The inmates escaped through a nearly 400-yard tunnel they had spent six months digging, Taliban spokesman Qari Yousef Ahmadi said. The escape at the prison, which holds 1,200 inmates, began after dark and finished just before daybreak, said Maj. Tim James, a spokesman for NATO forces in Kabul. I’m not going to speculate about how they were able to dig an 1,100 foot tunnel without anyone noticing. Weirder prison escapes have been attempted, including, most awesomely, The Great Escape. But in all likelihood at least one of the prison guards was aware this escape was happening and they chose to become complicit in it in some way—just another example of the lousy personnel screening in the Afghan security forces. We still don’t have a list of who the escapees were, and if they were important or involved in the 2008 escape or not. One figure claims 106 of them are Taliban commanders, which may or may not be real (or affect the happy ISAF narrative that they’re removing mid-level commanders from the battlefield). What we can be certain of is that this will have dramatic consequences. The 2008 break resulted in a huge uptick in area violence, and the first of many failed NATO attempts to “retake” the countryside surrounding Kandahar City. Those attempts are, by and large, still ongoing (though they didn’t begin with the 2008 escape). We can expect something similar. Given the coordination required to dig this tunnel and organize a massive breakout, we can also expect the escapees will have more opportunities to hide and go underground. It’s really difficult to see this break as anything other than disaster. But at least we now know who really has the momentum in the South. Unfortunately, it’s not us.”

[Evidence of misprision of treason; during the 2008 and 2010 Taliban Great Escapes, Canadian Privy Councilors used Entrust Public Key Infrastructure – developed with root authority provided through the office of the Governor General of Canada – to task the Special Operating Agency, Correctional Service Canada] Commissioner Don Head concludes successful visit to Kandahar and Kabul, Afghanistan During my visit, I had the opportunity to visit correctional institutions and meet my counterparts within the Government of Afghanistan. “I praise their efforts in working to strengthen the Afghan correctional system and respect the rule of law. Canada is advising and assisting the Afghan security forces in establishing enduring security in Kandahar province and strengthening Kandahar prisons in ways that recognize rule of law and respect international standards of incarceration. To date, the Government of Canada has invested over $132 million to enhance Afghan justice and corrections capacity and infrastructure, provide training and mentoring to the military, police, and human rights workers. “It is very clear to me that the Afghan government has made much progress in the area of corrections. This visit reaffirmed my confidence that the NDS and the Central Prison Directorate within the Ministry of Justice are committed to strengthening human rights and the rule of law in Afghanistan. It is important to consider how far the Afghans have come since the fall of the Taliban. “I appreciated the open dialogue and the commitment both institutions have shown to working with Canada to improve the well-being of detained persons and to enhancing the professionalism of their respective organizations. We are proud to offer them the benefit of our advice and training.” The Correctional Service of Canada plays a key role in advancing one of Canada’s six priorities in Afghanistan - which is to help the Afghan government sustain a more secure environment and promote law and order. Regular visits and discussions with our partners throughout the Afghan corrections system are an important part of this process. Canada continues to contribute to human rights initiatives undertaken by several Afghan ministries and agencies, including the Ministry of Justice and the NDS, as well as the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission, among others. Canada’s whole of government effort in Afghanistan is critical in assisting the Afghans in their efforts for democratization and security sector reform, including police, justice and corrections. For more information, please contact: Christa McGregor Correctional Service Canada (613) 808-5466 Christa.McGregor@csc-scc.gc.ca”


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