Friday, November 22, 2013

#1761: Marine Links MI-3 Peg Boy Mariners to SSY Lend Lease Racket, Coldstream Snipers’ JFK

Plum City – ( United States Marine Field McConnell has linked the late Wallis Simpson – apparent peg-boy mentor for the MI-3 Master Mariners Livery Company – to the Lend Lease racket apparently operated through the Simpson, Spence & Young (SSY) communications network to sink ships on both sides of WWII and the alleged deployment of a Coldstream Guards sniper team by former Intelligence officer Ernest Aldrich Simpson (Aharon Solomons), to assassinate the prospective lend-lease whistle-blower United States President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963.

JFK's Speech about Secret Societies

Wallis Simpson [Peg-boy mentor for SSY/MI-3 Master Mariners] and Edward visit Nazis in Germany, 1937 [HD]

Lend Lease Program (World War II)

The JFK Assassination - the Last Shot

More to follow but McConnell expects to make a definitive statement on November 22, 2013.


MI-3B = Livery Company patent-pool supply-chain users of Privy Purse and Forfeiture Fund Marcy (Forfeiture Fund – KPMG Small Business Loan Auction – Con Air Medical JABS)
+ Inkster (Privy Purse – KPMG tax shelter – RCMP Wandering Persons – Loss Adjuster fraud)
+ Interpol (Berlin ‘41-‘45 – Operation Paperclip Foreign Fugitive – William Higgitt – Entrust)
+ Intrepid (William Stephenson – GAPAN, Mariners patent pools – Wild Bill Pearl Harbor 9/11) +Baginski (Serco Information Technologists Skynet sodomite mesh, KPMG Consulting Tillman)

MI-3 = Marine Interruption Intelligence and Investigation unit set up in 1987 to destroy above

McConnell’s Book 12 shows agents in his Marine Interruption, Intelligence and Investigations (MI-3) group mingling in various OODA exit modes with agents of the Marcy Inkster Interpol Intrepid (MI-3) Livery protection racket based at Skinners’ Hall, Dowgate Hill.

Prequel 1: #1759: Marine Links MI-3 Mariners Peg Boy Cipher to JFK Wallis Simpson 3rd Coast Snipers

“Passed on March 11, 1941, this act set up a system that would allow the United States to lend or lease war supplies to any nation deemed "vital to the defense of the United States."

In July 1940, after Britain had sustained the loss of 11 destroyers to the German Navy over a 10-day period, newly elected British Prime Minister Winston Churchill requested help from President Roosevelt. Roosevelt responded by exchanging 50 destroyers for 99-year leases on British bases in the Caribbean and Newfoundland. As a result, a major foreign policy debate erupted over whether the United States should aid Great Britain or maintain strict neutrality.

In the 1940 Presidential election campaign, Roosevelt promised to keep America out of the war. He stated, "I have said this before, but I shall say it again and again and again; your boys are not going to be sent into any foreign wars." Nevertheless, FDR wanted to support Britain and believed the United States should serve as a "great arsenal of democracy." Churchill pleaded, "Give us the tools and we'll finish the job." In January 1941, following up on his campaign pledge and the prime minister's appeal for arms, Roosevelt proposed to Congress a new military aid bill.

The plan proposed by FDR was to "lend-lease or otherwise dispose of arms" and other supplies needed by any country whose security was vital to the defense of the United States. In support of the bill, Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee during the debate over lend-lease, "We are buying . . . not lending. We are buying our own security while we prepare. By our delay during the past six years, while Germany was preparing, we find ourselves unprepared and unarmed, facing a thoroughly prepared and armed potential enemy." Following two months of debate, Congress passed the Lend-Lease Act, meeting Great Britain’s deep need for supplies and allowing the United States to prepare for war while remaining officially neutral.”

“MILESTONES: 1937–1945

Lend-Lease and Military Aid to the Allies in the Early Years of World War II During World War II, the United States began to provide significant military supplies and other assistance to the Allies in September 1940, even though the United States did not enter the war until December 1941. Much of this aid flowed to the United Kingdom and other nations already at war with Germany and Japan through an innovative program known as Lend-Lease.

When war broke out in Europe in September 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared that while the United States would remain neutral in law, he could “not ask that every American remain neutral in thought as well.” Roosevelt himself made significant efforts to help nations engaged in the struggle against Nazi Germany and wanted to extend a helping hand to those countries that lacked the supplies necessary to fight against the Germans. The United Kingdom, in particular, desperately needed help, as it was short of hard currency to pay for the military goods, food, and raw materials it needed from the United States.

Though President Roosevelt wanted to provide assistance to the British, both American law and public fears that the United States would be drawn into the conflict blocked his plans. The Neutrality Act of 1939 allowed belligerents to purchase war materiel from the United States, but only on a “cash and carry” basis. The Johnson Act of 1934 also prohibited the extension of credit to countries that had not repaid U.S. loans made to them during World War I—which included Great Britain. The American military opposed the diversion of military supplies to the United Kingdom. The Army’s Chief of Staff, General George C. Marshall, anticipated that Britain would surrender following the collapse of France, and thus American supplies sent to the British would fall into German hands. Marshall and others therefore argued that U.S. national security would be better served by reserving military supplies for the defense of the Western Hemisphere. American public opinion also limited Roosevelt’s options. Many Americans opposed involving the United States in another war. Even though American public opinion generally supported the British rather than the Germans, President Roosevelt had to develop an initiative that was consistent with the legal prohibition against the granting of credit, satisfactory to military leadership, and acceptable to an American public that generally resisted involving the United States in the European conflict.

On September 2, 1940, President Roosevelt signed a “Destroyers for Bases” agreement. Under the terms of the agreement, the United States gave the British more than 50 obsolete destroyers, in exchange for 99-year leases to territory in Newfoundland and the Caribbean, which would be used as U.S. air and naval bases. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill had originally requested that Roosevelt provide the destroyers as a gift, but the President knew that the American public and Congress would oppose such a deal. He therefore decided that a deal that gave the United States long-term access to British bases could be justified as essential to the security of the Western Hemisphere—thereby assuaging the concerns of the public and the U.S. military.

In December 1940, Churchill warned Roosevelt that the British were no longer able to pay for supplies. On December 17, President Roosevelt proposed a new initiative that would be known as Lend-Lease. The United States would provide Great Britain with the supplies it needed to fight Germany, but would not insist upon being paid immediately.

Instead, the United States would “lend” the supplies to the British, deferring payment. When payment eventually did take place, the emphasis would not be on payment in dollars. The tensions and instability engendered by inter-allied war debts in the 1920s and 1930s had demonstrated that it was unreasonable to expect that virtually bankrupt European nations would be able to pay for every item they had purchased from the United States. Instead, payment would primarily take the form of a “consideration” granted by Britain to the United States. After many months of negotiation, the United States and Britain agreed, in Article VII of the Lend-Lease agreement they signed, that this consideration would primarily consist of joint action directed towards the creation of a liberalized international economic order in the postwar world.

The United Kingdom was not the only nation to strike such a deal with the United States. Over the course of the war, the United States contracted Lend-Lease agreements with more than 30 countries, dispensing some $50 billion in assistance. Although British Prime Minister Winston Churchill later referred to the initiative as “the most unsordid act” one nation had ever done for another, Roosevelt’s primary motivation was not altruism or disinterested generosity. Rather, Lend-Lease was designed to serve America’s interest in defeating Nazi Germany without entering the war until the American military and public was prepared to fight. At a time when the majority of Americans opposed direct participation in the war, Lend-Lease represented a vital U.S. contribution to the fight against Nazi Germany. Moreover, the joint action called for under Article VII of the Lend-Lease agreements signed by the United States and the recipient nations laid the foundation for the creation of a new international economic order [NWO] in the postwar world.”

"[JFK on secret societies] The very word "secrecy" is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a people inherently and historically opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths and secret proceedings.

In my efforts to provide you a transcript of the attached fi We decided long ago that the dangers of excessive and unwarranted concealment of pertinent facts far outweighed the dangers which are cited to justify it. Even today, there is little value in opposing the threat of a closed society by imitating its arbitrary restrictions. Even today, there is little value in insuring the survival of our nation if our traditions do not survive with it. And there is very grave danger that an announced need for increased security will be seized upon those anxious to expand its meaning to the very limits of official censorship and concealment. That I do not intend to permit to the extent that it is in my control. And no official of my Administration, whether his rank is high or low, civilian or military, should interpret my words here tonight as an excuse to censor the news, to stifle dissent, to cover up our mistakes or to withhold from the press and the public the facts they deserve to know." le, I have discovered that the above paragraph is word for word the first 1:26.

The next 3 paragraphs and the first sentence of the next paragraph were omitted. I do not know why since I do not know what the editor of the original speech had in his or her mind. The file continues .....  

"For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy that relies on covert means for expanding its sphere of influence--on infiltration instead of invasion, on subversion instead of elections, on intimidation instead of free choice, on guerrillas by night instead of armies by day. It is a system which has conscripted vast human and material resources into the building of a tightly knit, highly efficient machine that combines military, diplomatic, intelligence, economic, scientific and political operations.

Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed." 

End at 2:28 - This is a solid piece in the transcript but ends mid paragraph.

Several more paragraphs of the transcript are skipped and the file continues....... 

 "No President should fear public scrutinity of his program. For from that scrutiny comes understanding; and from that understanding comes support or opposition. And both are necessary. I am not asking your newspapers to support the Administration, but I am asking your help in the tremendous task of informing and alerting the American people. For I have complete confidence in the response and dedication of our citizens whenever they are fully informed.

I not only could not stifle controversy among your readers-- I welcome it. This Administration intends to be candid about its errors; for as a wise man once said: "An error does not become a mistake until you refuse to correct it." We intend to accept full responsibility for our errors; and we expect you to point them out when we miss them.

Without debate, without criticism, no Administration and no country can succeed-- and no republic can survive. That is why the Athenian lawmaker Solon decreed it a crime for any citizen to shrink from controversy. And that is why our press was protected by the First (emphasized) Amendment-- the only business in America specifically protected by the Constitution-- not primarily to amuse and entertain, not to emphasize the trivial and sentimental, not to simply "give the public what it wants"--but to inform, to arouse, to reflect, to state our dangers and our opportunities, to indicate our crises and our choices, to lead, mold educate and sometimes even anger public opinion.

This means greater coverage and analysis of international news-- for it is no longer far away and foreign but close at hand and local. It means greater attention to improved understanding of the news as well as improved transmission. And it means, finally, that government at all levels, must meet its obligation to provide you with the fullest possible information outside the narrowest limits of national security...

This part ends at 4:52. mid sentence. It left out "--and we intend to do it." It also skips a paragraph and then the file continues ...

"And so it is to the printing press--to the recorder of mans deeds, the keeper of his conscience, the courier of his news-- that we look for strength and assistance, confident that with your help man will be what he was born to be: free and independent."

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was assassinated at 12:30 p.m. Central Standard Time (18:30 UTC) on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dealey Plaza, Dallas, Texas.[1][2] Kennedy was fatally shot by a sniper while traveling with his wife Jacqueline, Texas Governor John Connally, and Connally's wife Nellie, in a presidential motorcade. A ten-month investigation in 1963–64 by the Warren Commission concluded that Kennedy was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald, acting alone, and that Jack Ruby also acted alone when he killed Oswald before he could stand trial.

Although the Commission's conclusions were initially supported by a majority of the American public,[3] polls conducted between 1966 and 2003 found that as many as 80 percent of Americans have suspected that there was a plot or cover-up.[4][5] A 1998 CBS News poll showed that 76% of Americans believed the President had been killed as the result of a conspiracy.[6] A 2013 AP poll showed, that although the percentage had fallen, more than 59% of those polled still believed that more than one person was involved in the President's murder.[7][8]

In contrast to the conclusions of the Warren Commission, the United States House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA) concluded in 1978 that Kennedy was probably assassinated as a result of a conspiracy.[9] The HSCA found the original FBI investigation and the Warren Commission Report to be seriously flawed. While agreeing with the Commission that Oswald fired all the shots which caused the wounds to Kennedy and Connally, the HSCA stated that there were at least four shots fired (only three of which could be linked to Oswald) and that there was "...a high probability that two gunmen fired at [the] President."[10][11]

The HSCA did not identify any other person or group involved in the assassination besides Oswald, but they did specifically say the CIA, the Soviet Union, organized crime, and several other groups were not involved, although they could not rule out the involvement of individual members of those groups. Kennedy's assassination is still the subject of widespread debate and has spawned numerous conspiracy theories and alternative scenarios.”

In 1880 two shipbrokers, Ernest Louis Simpson, an Englishman, and Lewis H. Spence, an American, founded the firm of Simpson and Spence and set up an office in New York. In 1882 Captain William Young was invited to join the Partnership and open an office in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England. From then on the firm was known as Simpson Spence & Young.

In the years following, offices were opened in London and other UK cities in order to service local principals. New York and London became the focal points of worldwide shipping for several decades, and in these two centre’s Simpson Spence & Young built up specialist teams of brokers and back-up staff, which were later to form the successful springboard for future development and expansion. 

In the middle 1960's, the Partnership made the decision to expand internationally, and in 1966 an office was opened in Australia. Over the following 25 years Simpson Spence & Young, encouraged by the success of this venture, opened further offices in Vancouver (1973), Hong Kong (1975), Bogota (1986), Singapore (1991), Shanghai (1997), Jakarta (2001), Naples (2001), Oslo (2003), Zug (2003), a joint venture in Hamburg (2004), Beijing (2005), Mumbai (2007) [alleged base for planning the Mumbai Massacre], Monaco (2008) and Athens (2010).

Today, with all the offices linked by an excellent communication network [cf. Marconi, RCA and Serco patent pools used by MI-3 Mariners’ SSY and Maureen Baginski for 9/11], the flow of information and market intelligence circulating throughout the organisation enables all offices to give their clients a comprehensive worldwide service, unique amongst shipbroking companies. This service covers Dry Cargo Chartering, Power Projects, Freight Futures, Tanker Chartering, Chemical Chartering, New-Building Contracting, Sale and Purchase of second-hand tonnage, Demolition and Container Projects.

All offices and associates are backed by SSY Consultancy & Research Limited in London who offer information, statistics, market studies and consultancy on all shipping matters. The Agency Department in London has a wealth of information on the ports of North America, in which subject it specializes.

Simpson Spence & Young has remained an independent private Partnership since 1880, and today we are one of the largest international shipbroking organizations.”


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