Friday, March 14, 2014

#1885: Marine Links MI-3 Mycroft’s Smart Grid ZigBee Time to Serco MH370 Doomsday Clock

Plum City – ( United States Marine Field McConnell has linked Nicholas ‘Mycroft’ Soames’ apparent use of Smart Grid ZigBee timing signals to coordinate mass-casualty events for Langham Hotel and Resorts and the MI-3 Innholders Livery Company to Serco director Maureen Baginski’s alleged use of a cesium clock in a Boeing E-4B Doomsday (Nightwatch) aircraft to synchronize packet-switching of phony BBC news stories with the abduction of 20 Freescale employees and the EW hijacking of Malaysian Airlines Flight MH 370 on March 8, 2014.

McConnell recognizes Mycroft Warrants as writs issued by a competent but blackmailed or extorted officer, usually a judge or magistrate, who permits otherwise illegal acts (the spoliation of evidence; spot fixing body bags at crime-scene investigations; bypassing autopsies to conceal murder-for-hire and placing blackmailed pedophiles in decoy triage teams) and affords the person executing the writ protection from damages if the act is performed.

MI-3 = Kristine Marcy (sister) + Norman Inkster + Interpol + Intrepid (William Stephenson)

McConnell claims Serco root companies extorted then Prince of Wales (Bullingdon alumnus, later Edward VII) to issue Mycroft warrants to a telegraph-betting center in London’s Langham Hotel – an alleged pedophile honeypot used to blackmail MI-3 guests and now Zigbee assassins.

McConnell notes that while Serco’s pedophile blackmailers may have controlled hotel crime scenes and bookmaking frauds since 1888, MI-3 founder William “Intrepid” Stephenson made the first use of BBC wireless photo transmissions to blackmail Langham habitués who may have included Bullingdon alumnus the late and treasonous Duke of Windsor and the late Winston Churchill – a compulsive story-boarding gambler and the grandfather of the new Serco Chief Executive Officer Rupert Soames and his BBC Mycroft role-playing brother Nicholas Soames.

McConnell claims that after the 1979-1995 Unabomb campaign, Nicholas Soames, a former personal assistant to the late chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee Mark Hatfield, and Ms. Baginski developed Serco’s SkyNet satellite communications with Smart Grid clocks and equipped the MI-3 Innholders' ZigBee agents for the Doomsday decoy and drone maneuvers of 9/11 and MH 370.

McConnell believes Privy Councillor Soames – former Defence Minister under the Langham Hotel habitué John Major and a skilled practitioner of MI-3 Mycroft Qui tam frauds (cf. Serco tags, FAA Contract Towers, Skynet Wi-Fi, USPTO, Obamacare) – ordered Baginski to ­­­stage a Zigbee hijack in which the real MH370 was landed in China so Freescale passengers could be saved, EW devices stolen and a decoy plane prepped to be found later in a phony Doomsday search.

McConnell invites key word Googlers to read excerpts below and ask why “The List of Sherlock Innholders – The Wrist That Didn’t Bleed” book has a new title at

Prequel 1:
#1884: Marine Links Mycroft’s MI-3 ZigBee Irregulars to Obamacare MH370 Navigators

March 14 2014 Breaking News Flight MH370 sent signals to satellite for hours

You see, but you do not observe!

Real Time Location System based on Zigbee

Strange meeting - Sherlock – BBC

“NeverVotedBush writes with news reported by CNN that a passenger manifest for the flight that went missing on its way from Malaysia to China indicates that "Twenty of the passengers aboard the flight work with Freescale Semiconductor, a [Zigbee development] company based in Austin, Texas. The company said that 12 of the employees are from Malaysia and eight are from China," and writes "Apparently, at least two passengers used stolen passports to board."”

Small Business [ZigBee] Prime Contractor of the Year: Kent Schien founded Innoventor, Inc., of St. Louis, Mo., a design/build engineering firm in the basement of his home in 1996. The company is known as “The Original Idea People” because its core competency is combining cross-industry experience and cutting edge technology to provide innovative solutions for a variety of customer demands. Its customers include the government, aerospace, military, automotive, commercial, industrial, agriculture, food and beverage, medical, pharmaceutical and power industries. It has been a prime contractor at Warner Robbins Air Force Base in Georgia for the cesium-based master regulating clock, a precision instrument that regulates secondary clocks in complicated systems, for the E-4B Advanced Airborne Command Post for the U.S. Air Force.”

Search for missing jet expands into Indian Ocean amid signs it flew on for hours
By Chris Brummitt And Joan Lowy, The Associated Press | The Canadian Press 
March 14, 2014
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - The international search for the missing Malaysian jetliner expanded further into the Indian Ocean on Friday amid signs the aircraft may have flown on for hours after its last contact with air-traffic control nearly a week ago.

A U.S. official told The Associated Press that the Malaysia Airlines plane sent signals to a satellite for four hours after the aircraft went missing early last Saturday, raising the possibility the jet carrying 239 people could have flown far from the current search areas. It also increased speculation that whatever happened to the plane was a deliberate act.

Malaysia's Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said the search was expanding further afield, not because of any new information about the plane's flight, but because the aircraft has not yet been found.

Malaysian officials declined to discuss when —or even whether — they had information about signals to satellites, and that they would release details only when verified. Hishammuddin said Malaysian investigators have worked with U.S. colleagues in Kuala Lumpur since Sunday.

"I hope within a couple of days to have something conclusive," he told a press conference.

If the plane had disintegrated during flight or had suffered some other catastrophic failure, all signals — the pings to the satellite, the data messages and the transponder — would be expected to stop at the same time. Experts say a pilot or passengers with technical expertise may have switched off the transponder in the hope of flying undetected.

No theory, however, has been ruled out in one of aviation history's most puzzling mysteries.

The Beijing-bound Boeing 777-200 last communicated with air traffic base stations east of Malaysia in the South China Sea, which for several days has the main focus of the search. Planes and ships also have been searching the Strait of Malacca west of Malaysia because of a blip on military radar suggested the plane might have turned in that direction after the last confirmed contact.

If the plane flew another four hours, it could be much farther away.

Indian ships and planes have been searching northwest of Malaysia in the eastern Andaman Sea, and on Friday expanded their search to areas west of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands chain Friday, said V.S.R. Murty, an Indian Coast Guard inspector-general.

The White House said the U.S. may be drawn into a new phase of the search in the vast Indian Ocean but did not offer details. The U.S. Navy 7th Fleet said it was moving one of its ships, the USS Kidd, into the Strait of Malacca.

Hishamuddin said the search also would be expanded to more remote parts of the South China Sea as well.

However, Vietnam, which has been heavily involved in the search from the start, downgraded its hunt in the South China Sea to regular from emergency on Friday by reducing the frequency of aircraft flights and cruises by ships involved, said Lt. Gen. Vo Van Tuan, deputy chief of staff of Vietnamese People's Army.

The U.S. official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to discuss the situation by name, said the plane wasn't transmitting data to the satellite but was sending a signal to establish contact.

Boeing offers a satellite service that can receive a stream of data during flight on how the aircraft is functioning and relay the information to the plane's home base. The idea is to provide information before the plane lands on whether maintenance work or repairs are needed.

Malaysia Airlines didn't subscribe to that service, but the plane still had the capability to connect with the satellite and was automatically sending pings, the official said.

Boeing has not commented.

"It's like when your cellphone is off but it still sends out a little 'I'm here' message to the cellphone network," the official said. "That's how sometimes they can triangulate your position even though you're not calling because the phone every so often sends out a little bleep. That's sort of what this thing was doing."

Messages involving a different, more rudimentary data service also were received from the airliner for a short time after the plane's transponder — a device used to identify the plane to radar — went silent, the U.S. official said.

Hishammuddin said Malaysia was asking for radar data from India and other neighbouring countries to see if they can trace it flying northwest. There was no word Friday that any other country had such details on the plane, and they may not exist.

In Thailand, secondary surveillance radar, which requires a signal from aircraft, runs 24 hours a day, but primary surveillance radar, which requires no signal at all, ordinarily shuts down at night at some locations, said a Royal Thai Air Force officer who asked not to be named because he is not authorized to talk to the media on the issue.

Air Marshal Vinod Patni, a retired Indian air force officer and a defence expert, said radar facilities in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands area don't work around the clock, either. "These are generally switched on and off as and when required. A radar may be kept on for 24 hours on certain days. I won't say that the Indian radars are highly sophisticated in the region," he said.

Patni also said there are gaps in the coverage areas, including within the area being searched for the missing plane. He couldn't give an exact location for specific gaps, but said pilots are well aware of them.

The possibility that the plane flew long after its last confirmed contact opens the possibility that one of the pilots, or someone with flying experience, wanted to hijack the plane for some later purpose, kidnap the passengers or commit suicide by plunging the aircraft into the sea.

Mike Glynn, a committee member of the Australian and International Pilots Association, said he considers pilot suicide to be the most likely explanation for the disappearance, as was suspected in a SilkAir crash during a flight from Singapore to Jakarta in 1997 and an EgyptAir flight from Los Angeles to Cairo in 1999.

"A pilot rather than a hijacker is more likely to be able to switch off the communications equipment," Glynn said. "The last thing that I, as a pilot, want is suspicion to fall on the crew, but it's happened twice before."

Glynn said a pilot may have sought to fly the plane into the Indian Ocean to reduce the chances of recovering data recorders, and to conceal the cause of the disaster.

Experts said that if the plane crashed into the ocean, some debris should be floating even if most of the jet is submerged. Past experience shows that finding the wreckage can take weeks or even longer, especially if the location of the plane is in doubt.
Lowy reported from Washington. Associated Press writers Ashok Sharma in New Delhi, Jim Gomez in Kuala Lumpur, Tran V. Minh in Hanoi, Vietnam, Thanyarat Doksone in Bangkok, Rod McGuirk in Canberra, Australia, and Josh Lederman in Washington contributed to this report.”

The E-4 fleet was originally deployed in 1974,[1] when it was termed National Emergency Airborne Command Post (NEACP) (often pronounced "kneecap"). The aircraft was to provide a survivable platform to conduct war operations in the event of a nuclear attack. Early in the operations of the E-4, the media dubbed the aircraft as "the doomsday planes".

The aircraft were originally stationed at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, so that the U.S. President and Secretary of Defense could access them quickly in the event of an emergency. The origin of the name "Nightwatch" comes from the richly detailed Rembrandt painting, The Night Watch, that depicts local townsfolk protecting a town; it was selected by the Squadron's first commanding officer. Later, the aircraft were moved to Offutt Air Force Base where they would be safer from attack. Until 1994, one E-4B was stationed at Andrews Air Force Base at all times so the President could easily board it in times of world crisis.

When a President boards the E-4, its call sign becomes "Air Force One". (NEACP aircraft originally used the static call sign "Silver Dollar"; this call sign faded from use when daily call signs were put in use.) The E-4B also serves as the Secretary of Defense's preferred means of transportation when traveling outside the United States.[12] The spacious interior and sophisticated communications capability provided by the aircraft allow the Secretary's senior staff to work for the duration of the mission.

All E-4s were converted to B-models by 1985.[1] With the adoption of two highly-modified Boeing 747-200Bs (known as VC-25A in Air Force parlance) to serve as Air Force One in 1989 and the end of the Cold War, the need for NEACP diminished. In 1994, NEACP began to be known as NAOC, and it took on a new responsibility: ferrying Federal Emergency Management Agency crews to natural disaster sites and serving as a temporary command post on the ground until facilities could be built on site. Evidently no E-4B was employed during the Hurricane Katrina Disaster of 2005, though one E-4B was used by FEMA following Hurricane Opal in 1995.[13]

The "cocked" or "on alert" E-4B is manned 24 hours a day with a watch crew on board guarding all communications systems awaiting a launch order (klaxon launch). Those crew members not on watch would be in the alert barracks, gymnasium, or at other base facilities. The 24 hour alert status at Andrews AFB ended when President Clinton ordered the aircraft to remain at Offutt unless needed, though relief crews remain based at Andrews and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. One E-4B is kept on alert at all times.[1]”

Serco Inc. is the outfit chosen by the City of Chicago's Department of Revenue to wander the streets dishing outtickets for parking/permit infractions.  Over the past few years I feel that I have personally done my part to significantly raise the value of Serco's stock.  The trouble with these ticket-wielding vigilantes is that they are unreasonable.  If you are ever parked on a metered street in lakeview, be sure to keep your eye on the clock.  These cats stroll the avenues and are attracted to the blinking red lights of expired parking meters, like flies to, well, you know! I am not a fan of this Serco, Inc.  I shouldn't hate the people who are giving me the tickets, but I do.  I feel like these people would be doing our fine city a better duty by cleaning it, promoting non-violence, I dunno just about anything other than making my life more difficult.”

Yours sincerely,

Field McConnell, United States Naval Academy, 1971; Forensic Economist; 30 year airline and 22 year military pilot; 23,000 hours of safety; Tel: 715 307 8222

David Hawkins Tel: 604 542-0891 Forensic Economist; former leader of oil-well blow-out teams; now sponsors Grand Juries in CSI Crime and Safety Investigation

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