Friday, April 18, 2014

#1928: Marine Links CNN 370 uFly Storyboard to Serco, Abbott and the MI-3 Red Switch Sham

Plum City – (AbelDanger.net). United States Marine Field McConnell has linked CNN Martin Savidge’s development of a MH Flight 370 storyboard on a uFly simulator in Toronto to Serco director Maureen Baginski’s Red Switch Network; allegedly configured for use by Tony Abbott and other traveling guests of the MI-3 Innholders Livery Company in a sham coordination of the search for the plane at the bottom of the Indian Ocean.

McConnell believes that Serco ran red-switch operations from the Fairmont Hamilton Princess hotel in Bermuda during WWII and tested the systems through regular, annual continuity-of-government exercises with the Five Eyes countries (cf. Clinton's Port Douglas Sheraton and Global Guardian 9/11 on Sep. 12, 2001 at 17:37:19!).

McConnell claims that former U.K. Minister of Defence Nicholas Soames, ordered Baginski to configure MI-3 red switches so Savidge could coordinate news of the March 8 hijack from his hotel in Australia while Serco agents tried to drive Flight 370 into KL’s Petronas Towers using the uFly simulator near the Sheraton Hotel at Toronto Airport and blame the attack on China’s ongoing theft of stealth technology from Freescale Semiconductors.

McConnell believes erstwhile colleagues at the Marine Corps Intelligence Activity Command in Quantico thwarted the Petronas Towers attack by using a Heartbleed bug to re-override Serco’s MI-3 hotel red-switch network and fly MH 370 to a Cat III C landing on Diego Garcia (BIOT).

Prequel:
#1927: Marine Links Serco MI-3 Red Switch Sheraton to MH 370 uFly Simulator Hack 

Prequel 2:

uFly currently operates a flight simulator modeled after the B 777 -200ER.

BREAKING: Malaysian PM News Conference over MH370 Hijacked 


2014 - BBC World News - Malaysia Airlines Flight MH-370 Vanishes Without Trace - 8/3/14  

Jon Stewart Destroys CNN On Excessive MH370 Airline coverage  

The Curious Case of Flight 370  

Flight instructor who appeared on CNN fired  

NTVC - Grand Opening Ufly Simulator in Mississauga, ON (EN-PT Subtitles)






Time runs out to find MH370: Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott concedes the search will soon have to stop
Australia's Prime Minister has conceded that the best leads will soon be exhausted
Underwater search vessels were recalled to the surface when safety mechanism kicked in
Data was downloaded from device before it was put back to work again

Initial analysis of data showed it had not detected anything significant
By RICHARD SHEARS
PUBLISHED: 03:18 GMT, 17 April 2014 | UPDATED: 09:07 GMT, 17 April 2014

After more than a week of silence from the bottom of the Indian Ocean, Australia's Prime Minister has conceded that the best leads will soon be exhausted - and the search for MH370 will have to stop. Tony Abbott said that when all leads had been exhausted in about a week 'we stop, we regroup, we reconsider.'

The chances of finding the wreckage of the Boeing 777 in an area 1500 miles north west of Perth depend on the underwater drone Bluefin-21, which was today being prepared for its third launch after two earlier search operations deep in the Ocean found nothing of any significance.

Mr Abbott told the Wall Street Journal that if the drone fails to locate wreckage, believed by analysts to be lying some three to four miles down on the Ocean floor, a rethink on the search operation would have to be made.

He remained confident, however, that the search was being conducted in the right area, based on electronic signals, possibly from the Malaysian Airlines' plane's black boxes - messages from the deep picked up by a 'ping' detecting device being towed behind the Australian ship Ocean Shield, But while Mr Abbott held out what appeared to be diminishing hope, the use of Bluefin-21 has been criticised by the man who has been at the forefront of the search for the wreckage of the plane flown by aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart in 1937.

Mr Richard Gillespie, Founder of the International Group for Historical Aircraft Recovery, said that on one of his many trips to the Pacific Ocean searching for the wreckage of the Earhart plane he had employed the use of Bluefin-21 - and found it lacking.

'I can tell you, it didn't work for us,' he told CNN.

'We were very hopeful the Bluefin-21 would be the answer, the way to search for the very hard to find wreckage.

'What we found was that the Bluefin-21 couldn't perform reliably.

'We had extremely frustrating aborted missions, just as we have seen in the Indian Ocean.' During this week's searches, Bluefin has had to be brought back to the surface early in each of its first two dives. 

On the first occasion its safety programme kicked in when it reached a depth of about 3,000 miles and it came back to the surface.

When it was deployed a second time, it had to be brought back up to repair 'technical issues' before it was put back into the water.

On each of the two dives it has found nothing that gives searchers any hope of locating the plane's wreckage.

The drone was forced to end its first deployment early on Monday after it exceeded its 4.5 km (14,750 feet) depth limit in the remote stretch of ocean where search authorities believe the jetliner crashed after its disappearance on March 8 with 239 people on board.

The introduction of the Bluefin marks a methodical, slower paced new phase of the search, now in its 40th day and described by the search coordinator, retired Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston, as the most expensive in aviation history. 

U.S. Naval personnel have said the drone could take up to two months to scour a 600 sq km area where the plane is believed to have sunk.”

CNN Flight Simulator Reports on Flight MH 370 using our simulator [spoliation inference of fraudulent story boarding by

We have been helping CNN with their investigative reporting of the missing flight MH370. CNN has been filming in our simulator recreating scenarios to answer many questions of what could have happened to the missing Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 flight. Our prayers go out to the families of the missing crew and passengers.

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370/MAS370) was a scheduled international passenger flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing that lost contact with air traffic control on 8 March 2014 at 01:20 less than an hour after takeoff. At 07:24, Malaysia Airlines (MAS) reported the flight as missing. The aircraft, a Boeing 777-200ER, was carrying 12 Malaysian crew members and 227 passengers from 14 nations. 

A multinational search and rescue effort [allegedly coordinated through Serco’s MI-3 Red Switch Network], later reported as the largest in history, was initiated in the Gulf of Thailand and the South China Sea Within a few days, this was extended to include the Strait of Malacca and Andaman Sea. On 15 March, based on military radar data and radio “pings” between the aircraft and an Inmarsat satellite, investigators concluded that it had first headed west across the Malay Peninsula, then continued on a northern or southern track for approximately seven hours. The search in the South China Sea was abandoned. Three days later the Australian Maritime Safety Authority began searching the southern part of the Indian Ocean.

uFly Simulator
Tel: 416-777-CAN1 (416-777-2261)
Address: 1535 Meyerside Dr. Unit 6 
Mississauga ON L5T 1M9
Open: Tuesday - Friday 12:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday - Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
Email: ufly@uflysimulator.ca” 

Nearly 2 weeks in fake cockpit for CNN's Martin Savidge due to Malaysia plane story
David Bauder / The Associated Press
March 28, 2014 09:43 AM

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Thanks for the concern, but CNN's Martin Savidge says he's not looking to escape from the Canadian flight simulator where he has spent much of the past two weeks testing theories on what happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. 

 Savidge and his "co-pilot," Mitchell Casado, are the most visible symbols of CNN's blanket coverage of the story of the missing airplane. They have logged so much airtime reporting from the fake cockpit that the hashtag #freemartinsavidge appears on Twitter.

"I hope he is getting up to stretch his legs," one person tweeted. Another bored viewer is obsessed with flight instructor Casado's fashion sense, posting several pictures of him in different plaid shirts. 

Despite spending a series of 12- to 18-hour days in the cockpit, the Atlanta-based Savidge said he's still excited about his open-ended assignment. "In a horrible tragedy, I'm at least blessed with a good place to report from, to try and bring some clarity," he said.

CNN initially sought to rent a real 777 airplane for its coverage, but found it impossible. Individual airlines were also reluctant to make their simulators available. So CNN arranged time with the company uFly, from Mississauga, Ontario, near the Toronto airport, which has a simulator that is the same model of the plane lost in Asia.

Savidge, who had been vacationing in Australia when the plane went missing on March 8, was sent to Canada for one day on March 14 and returned home for the weekend. The response to his reports was so positive, CNN sent him back on March 17, and he's been there since. Other media organizations have sought to use the simulator but CNN blocks them by keeping it booked (the company won't say how much this is costing).

Instead of creating graphics, Savidge said it's valuable to show what instruments like the transponder that are talked about in news reports actually look like and where they are located in relation to a pilot. 

Mostly, they use the machine to simulate what might happen under certain scenarios. This week, he asked Casado off-air to show what might happen to a 777 if it ran out of fuel. It proved horrific: lights flashed, alarms sounded, the nose pointed skyward while gravity pulled the plane down. It fell backward toward the ocean.

"Even though it's simulated, it's quite awful to see ... we made a pact that we would never, ever show something on the air like that," Savidge said.

CNN has been criticized — mocked, even — for spending hour upon hour talking about the plane. The latest came Friday on MSNBC's "Morning Joe." ''Let's build a cockpit!" said that show's Mika Brzezinski, before turning to MSNBC's favourite story: New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's bridge scandal.

CNN's motivations are obvious. Since its extensive coverage began, CNN viewership is up 84 per cent over what it had been before the plane went missing, the Nielsen company said. During that same period, Fox News Channel's audience has increased 2 per cent, while MSNBC is down 11 per cent. 

"The amount of coverage seems to be in relation to the amount of interest and the amount of interest seems to be incredibly high probably because all of us have some theory as to what might have happened," said Savidge, who's now recognized on the street as "that cockpit guy." His own theories have fluctuated. Savidge once believed it was an accident but now thinks Flight 370 was taken down intentionally.

On Twitter, one viewer wondered if Savidge has spent more time in a plane than George Clooney's character in "Up in the Air." Savidge said he thought he would never spend as much time in a 777 as his 19-hour trip back from Australia, and now figures he's logged enough hours in the simulator that he's effectively repeated that trip several times over.

Often, when the cameras are off, Savidge takes some informal flying lessons from Casado. The simulator's computer can show the approaches to some 24,000 airports; Savidge said they've tried 83, including one in the Himalayas reputed to be the world's toughest.

Don't expect him in a real captain's seat quite yet, though.

"I think I can go into a cockpit and figure out what buttons not to push at this point," he said. "At least I would do no harm. I definitely wouldn't want to try something like landing, but maybe I could keep you at altitude for a while."

David Bauder can be reached at dbauder@ap.org or on Twitter@dbauder. His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/david-bauder

Online: 
http://www.cnn.com/

© Copyright 2014”

Martin Savidge (born 1957/58[1] in Lachine, Quebec, Canada) is an Edward R. Murrow and local Emmy Award-winning American television news correspondent.

Savidge worked for NBC News and was a special correspondent and former anchor for public television's Worldfocus nightly news program in the role of a special correspondent. He previously worked for WJW, Cleveland, where he also worked with current NBC correspondent Kelly O'Donnell.[citation needed] Savidge began anchoring CNN Newsroom in January 2011.[2] 

Biography[edit]

Savidge was born in Lachine, Quebec, Canada to British parents, who soon after moved to the United States.[3] He holds dual citizenship for both Canada and the United States.[1] Savidge grew up in Rocky River, Ohio and graduated from Rocky River High School in 1976.[4] He studied theater at Beck Center for the Arts in Lakewood, Ohio.[5]

Savidge earned a Bachelor's degree in Journalism from Ohio University in 1981.[6][7] Savidge's early career in journalism included a stint at WCIA in Champaign, Illinois.[8] He interned at WKYC, and reported for the Associated Press.[7] In September 1984, Savidge joined WJW,[7] where he won nine Emmy Awards, five in Savidge's final year at the station. One Emmy-winning special examined the background of D-Day, and was inspired by his father Earnest, who served in the British Navy during World War II.[9]

Despite being a local reporter, Savidge's datelines while at WJW included Vietnam, Russia, and Ukraine.[7] In 1996, he was hired by CNN.[7] Savidge would still be a field reporter, but he would spend more time as anchor.[10]

Savidge joined NBC News in March 2004, but remained in Atlanta.[citation needed]

In 2005, Savidge reported for NBC News in New Orleans, Louisiana, when Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast. After Katrina, as head correspondent, he helped to open an NBC News bureau in New Orleans. He regularly gave reports about improvements and stories after Katrina.[citation needed] In October 2008, Savidge left full-time work at NBC[1] to be the anchor of Worldfocus, an American newscast focusing on international news.[11]

On 13 January 2009, Savidge began hosting a weekly radio show on BlogTalkRadio. The 30-minute talk show is focused on international news and includes a panel of guests.[12]

On 28 August 2009, Savidge announced on the program that Daljit Dhaliwal would be taking over his role on Worldfocus, although he would still host one week a month and have an opportunity to "step out from behind the desk".[13]

Savidge returned to CNN in 2009 as a freelancer. In March 2011, he again became a CNN staffer. [14]”

McConnell has been directed by Abel Danger Global to serve as expert witness to plaintiffs who may wish to sue for damages in re Serco’s alleged bugging of the MI-3 Hotel red-switch network and its alleged hacking of the Boeing Uninterruptible Autopilot of MH 370.

McConnell previously offered that same expert witness service to ALPA-FAA-NTSB and FBI in Civil Case 1:08-1600 (RMC) – he believes that the court to decide appropriate penalties in such cases, has to be the court with jurisdiction over Serco’s Hotel Red Switch air traffic control services and The International Civil Aviation Organization in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Yours sincerely,


Field McConnell, United States Naval Academy, 1971; Forensic Economist; 30 year airline and 22 year military pilot; 23,000 hours of safety; Tel: 715 307 8222

David Hawkins Tel: 604 542-0891 Forensic Economist; former leader of oil-well blow-out teams; now sponsors Grand Juries in CSI Crime and Safety Investigation


“Flight simulator pilot who became CNN hit fired for ‘shaming Canadians’ by dressing like a teen 
Rob Gillies, Associated Press | April 17, 2014 8:04 AM ET

More from Associated Press

YouTube/CNNTaking flight: uFly's owner said he fired Mitchell Casado in part for his refusal to dress professionally and making Canadians 'look very bad'.

Flight MH370 coverage on CNN made Mitchell Casado a star

A Mississauga flight simulator business fired an instructor who figured prominently in CNN’s coverage of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, saying he showed up late to his regular job and “shamed Canadians” by dressing like a teenager.

uFly company owner Claudio Teixeira said he fired Mitchell Casado on Wednesday in part for his refusal to dress professionally and making Canadians “look very bad all over the world.” 

Casado’s relaxed style of jeans and plaid shirts attracted attention during CNN’s constant coverage of the search for the missing flight.

CNN’s Martin Savidge and Casado logged many hours reporting from the fake cockpit located at the company’s office in near the Toronto airport, which has a simulator that is the same model of the lost plane.

CNN screengrabuFly company owner Claudio Teixeira said he fired Mitchell Casado on Wednesday in part for his refusal to dress professionally and making Canadians “look very bad all over the world.”  

CNN screengrabRecreating Flight 370's sharp left turn: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. 

Savidge, who had been vacationing in Australia when the plane went missing on March 8, was sent to Canada for one day on March 14 and returned home for the weekend. The response to his reports was so positive, CNN sent him back on March 17, and he stayed until Monday, April 14 — about 30 days in total. Two days later, Casado was fired.

Related

MH370 search sees Bluefin sub sent back to water as relatives storm out of meeting charging officials ‘wasting our time’
MH370 search area too deep for robotic sub scouring Indian Ocean for missing jet

Savidge and Casado spent 12 to 18-hour days in the cockpit, using the machine to simulate what might happen under certain scenarios.

Instead of creating graphics, Savidge said it’s valuable to show what instruments like the transponder that are talked about in news reports actually look like and where they are located in relation to a pilot. 

Mostly, they use the machine to simulate what might happen under certain scenarios. He said he asked Casado off-air to show what might happen to a 777 if it ran out of fuel. It proved horrific: lights flashed, alarms sounded, the nose pointed skyward while gravity pulled the plane down. It fell backward toward the ocean.

“Even though it’s simulated, it’s quite awful to see … we made a pact that we would never, ever show something on the air like that,” Savidge said.

They logged so much airtime reporting from the fake cockpit that the hashtag #freemartinsavidge appeared on Twitter.

On Wednesday, Savidge announced that he was finally free, and heading west.

“And so let the word spread across the land Martin Savidge is free at last,” he wrote on Twitter. “Now watch where I go!” Late Wednesday night, the reporter with “pretty strong claustrophobia” announced that his next assignment will take him under the sea. Savidge is now broadcasting live from a small submarine off the coast of Vancouver, B.C.

Teixeira said Casado didn’t come to work Tuesday when customers had the simulator booked. 

“This is not the first time. He’s been warned before,” he told The Associated Press. 

Teixeira says he received many email complaints about the instructor’s way of dressing during the time he appeared on CNN.

“Even though I let him be on TV he shamed us Canadians and shamed my company with the way he was dressing like he was 15 years old,” he said. “People were complaining that it wasn’t professional at all … If you go to any plane you don’t see them in shorts and sandals.”

Casado, who is reportedly from Scarborough but now based in Mississauga, declined to comment when reached by AP, saying “I’m not interested in talking to you.”

CNN screengrabCNN reporter Martin Savidge is now broadcasting live from a submarine off the coast of Vancouver, B.C. 

CNN/YouTubeCNN’s Martin Savidge and Casado logged many hours reporting from the fake cockpit.  

uFly issued a statement Thursday seeking to “clarify” its relationship with Casado, claiming he was not an employee “but rather an independent consultant who was retained by the company to fly the simulator.”

“Over time, there developed a difference of opinion as to how to do that between Mr. Casado and uFly which ultimately resulted in uFly ending the relationship yesterday,” the statement said.

Teixeira added that he had no intention of “offending fellow Canadians or anyone else for that matter.”

In a tweet earlier, Casado wrote “My boss had me training a new guy the last few days, and now that he can do my job, and CNN left, he fired me. That’s Ufly.”

CNN spokeswoman Bridget Leininger noted Casado is an employee of uFLY, not CNN.

Other media organizations had sought to use the simulator over the last month, but CNN blocked them by keeping it booked (the company wouldn’t say how much this cost).

Leininger said CNN will not broadcast from the simulator on Thursday but may do so in the future. Although CNN has been criticized for its blanket coverage, its viewership rose 84% last month over what it had been before the plane went missing, the Nielsen company said.

“The amount of coverage seems to be in relation to the amount of interest and the amount of interest seems to be incredibly high probably because all of us have some theory as to what might have happened,” said Savidge, who’s now recognized on the street as “that cockpit guy.” His own theories have fluctuated. Savidge once believed it was an accident but now thinks Flight 370 was taken down intentionally.

When the cameras were off, Savidge took some informal flying lessons from Casado.

The simulator’s computer can show the approaches to some 24,000 airports; Savidge said they’ve tried 83, including one in the Himalayas reputed to be the world’s toughest.

Don’t expect him in a real captain’s seat quite yet, though.

“I think I can go into a cockpit and figure out what buttons not to push at this point,” he said. “At least I would do no harm. I definitely wouldn’t want to try something like landing, but maybe I could keep you at altitude for a while.”

CNN screengrabInside the cockpit of a Boeing 777: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont

CNN screengrabWas Flight 370 trying to avoid radar?: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont.

Teixeira called Casado a nice guy and wished him luck but said a change had to be made.

“I am the boss. I am the owner. I put in the money. It has to be my rules. If you don’t agree with them you have to find another job,” he said.

He said he gave Casado two-weeks pay.

In a 2007 interview, Casado said “being a pilot for me was a very difficult thing. It’s kind of a Cinderella story.” March 14, 2014

CNN screengrabSinking fast in a Boeing 777 simulator: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. March 17, 2014 

CNN screengrabWhat may have happened inside the cockpit: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. March 18, 2014

CNN screengrabFlight 370: Examining fire theory: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. March 20, 2014

CNN screengrabWas MH370 a 'zombie plane': Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. March 23, 3014

CNN screengrabCNN tests reported sharp turn: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. March 26, 2014

CNN screengrabWhy would a plane send a 'partial ping'?: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. March 31, 2014

CNN screengrabFlight simulator demos search complications: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. April 7, 2014

CNN screengrabHiding in another plane's shadow: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. April 10, 2014

CNN screengrabReplicating dramatic altitude drop: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. April 14, 2014

CNN screengrabHow low was Flight 370 flying?: Flight instructor Mitchell Casado and CNN reporter Martin Savidge broadcast live from uFly's flight simulator in Mississauga, Ont. With files from the National Post”

1 comment:

  1. I did the whole flight in my sim and found the 200 ft setting worked very well. Made Diego Garcia with PLENTY of gas left over. At 184 feet indicated on the radar altimeter nothing but the Yank gear and plain ol Mk 1 eye ball is going to see it. The chances of MH370 being anyplace other than there is ZERO. It was a fun flight too. Wave hoppin in a 777 at 189 feet doing 310 knots for over 3 hours was a hoot. Too bad the folk on the real aircraft have to wait out this garbage in a cell on Diego Garcia.

    ReplyDelete

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