Saturday, May 31, 2014

#1982: Marine links Serco Blue-Bait Red-Switch Canada to SkyWave GLONASS Pentagon Bomb

Plum City – (AbelDanger.net). United States Marine Field McConnell has linked Blue-Bait Red-Switch Canada maneuvers apparently staged by Serco director Maureen Baginski during the Global Guardian war game of September 10-12, 2001, to Serco’s alleged use of a SkyWave GLONASS tracking and telemetry station in St. Petersburg to detonate the bomb which destroyed the Pentagon’s U.S. Navy Command Center on Sep 12, 2001 at 17:37:19 per the image below.

McConnell also notes that Serco air traffic controllers appear to have used Inmarsat – the British generator of phony MH 370 tracking data – and its 19-per-cent stake in SkyWave to bait GPS Blue Forces into standing down during a Cope Tiger exercise in Thailand in March 20114 while Serco operators of the Red Switch Network used GLONASS tracking to fly MH 370 to Diego Garcia.

Not having the constitutional erudition of a Barack Obama, McConnell offers his opinion that Serco’s Canadian government clients have engaged in casus belli (same words; singular or plural) – "An act or event that is used to justify war" – in attacking the Pentagon’s US Navy Command Center on 9/11 and the Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200 on March 8, 2014 and they must be punished accordingly.

Prequel 1:
#1978: Marine Links Serco’s 370 Red Switch Boeing to SkyWave GPS Blue Force Hacking

Never Aired PENTAGON 911 Video HD Where is the Boeing?  


Fabled Enemies 2008 · 911 War Games - Global Guardian

“New military hotline directly links top brass to U.S.
Canada is installing a hotline that will allow military brass and politicians to talk with their American counterparts during a time of war or in any other crisis.
BY THE OTTAWA CITIZEN JANUARY 14, 2006

Canada is installing a hotline that will allow military brass and politicians to talk with their American counterparts during a time of war or in any other crisis.

About $20 million is being spent on what is called the Defence Red Switch Network. The communications system is already running in some locations, including the defence minister's office and other undisclosed sites for the military's senior leadership. The system will provide a link for the Canadian government to various U.S. military headquarters as well as the North American Aerospace Defence Command, the joint U.S.-Canada alliance that monitors air and space approaches to the continent. After the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, there was criticism that senior Canadian officials, including then-prime minister Jean Chretien, were out of the communications loop during the initial stages of the terrorist strike.

The Citizen obtained documents on the red switch network under the access to information law, but Defence Department officials censored almost all details. They claimed releasing the material would be "injurious" to the defense of Canada, its international relations, as well as the detection of subversive or hostile activities.

The newspaper, however, found the details of the supposedly secret network, including its cost to taxpayers, on the department's own public webpage. Details of a similar system that would allow U.S. President George W. Bush to communicate with his top level commanders was also on a Pentagon webpage. 

Canadian military officials were not available to explain why information about the network is considered secret when such details have already been put out in the public domain by both the U.S. and Canada. 

xThe red switch network is considered secure, meaning that it has technology to prevent its transmissions from being monitored or intercepted. Presumably the Canadian system can link up with the president's network. 

Martin Shadwick, a strategic studies professor with York University, said such a system makes sense in that Canada and the U.S. share a common goal in protecting North America. He noted that similar communications systems existed during the Cold War.

But analyst Steve Staples said the hotline is another example of the growing integration of the U.S. and Canadian militaries and the increased involvement of the Canadian Forces in American-led operations. "This system just allows the Canadian military and government leaders to get their orders from Washington more quickly," said Mr. Staples, an analyst with the Ottawa-based Polaris Institute.

The Citizen requested information on the red switch network almost four weeks ago, but military officials have not been available to comment. But according to the Defence webpage, the network "allows access to the U.S. system (Forces wide) and will enhance north/south and internal connectivity -- particularly during times of crisis."

According to a Pentagon site, the network provides the president, secretary of defence, joint chiefs of staff, combatant commanders and selected agencies with secure voice communications up to the top secret level. The system is for use during war and other emergencies. Other U.S. defense and federal government agencies can access the network if they have approval from the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, according to the site.

The website also includes a phone number that U.S. government officials can call to request entry to the network.

Mr. Staples said the level of secrecy in Canada surrounding the network is disturbing. "I think the Defence Department is worried that Canadians are going to realize the extent our military is being integrated into the U.S. system," he added.

Critics have warned about a new wave of secrecy at the Defence Department. Officials there are censoring information in official documents released to the public even though the same material is already available on government Internet sites. Some critics say this blanket of secrecy raises questions about government accountability and openness.

Last week, the Citizen reported the Defence Department is withholding information about the Pentagon's missile shield that is already on the U.S. government's websites, while at the same time claiming the security of Canada could be harmed if the names of senior American officers treated to a taxpayer-financed reception more than a year ago are released.

In addition, the newspaper obtained two missile shield briefing notes sent to Defence Minister Bill Graham. The department had originally told both the newspaper and an investigator with the Office of the Information Commissioner that those records, one of which discusses U.S. efforts to develop space weapons, never existed.

© © CanWest MediaWorks Publications Inc.”

“CFB Goose Bay awards $100 million service contract to Serco
JANUARY 9, 2014 BY EDI EDITOR LEAVE A COMMENT

Serco Inc. will continue to provide site support services at the 5 Wing Canadian Forces Base in Goose Bay, Labrador. The company, which is the Americas division of the multinational Serco Group, has won a $100 million contract with Public Works and Government Services Canada. The contract is a two-year extension to the current eleven-year agreement between Serco and the Canadian government. The contract will run until the end of 2016.

According to the statement issued by Serco, the company will continue to perform most non-military operation and maintenance functions at the base. The base comprises two 3,000-metre runways, over 200 buildings totaling approximately 275,000 square metres, and “extensive civil infrastructure.” The training area associated with the base covers 130,000 square kilometers.

Air traffic control is one of numerous services included in contract worth $100 million over two years awarded to Serco Inc. by the Department of National Defence for CFB Goose Bay.

The comprehensive suite of services provided are Aviation Services, which include air traffic control and Navaids; Logistics Services, including warehouse operations, snow and ice removal, environmental protection, hazardous waste management and material control; and Facilities Management Services, including engineering, telecomm/IT, electrical and airfield distribution systems, water treatment, central heating plant operations, grounds maintenance, security, food services and janitorial services. 

“Working with the Department of National Defence, Serco has provided site support services at Goose Bay for over fifteen years [i.e. since 1999] . We’re excited to continue our work on behalf of the Canadian government and to remain a viable part of the local Goose Bay community,” said Paul Dalglish, Serco’s Vice President of Canadian Operations. 

Serco Group, a $7.5 billion international business, has 122,000 employees in thirty countries, according to its statement. Serco Inc., headquartered in Reston, Virginia, focuses on providing services to government.”

“Casus belli is a Latin expression meaning "An act or event that provokes or is used to justify war".[1] Casus is a 4th declension neuter noun. Related to the English word "case",casus can mean "case", "incident", or "rupture". Belli is the genitive singular case of bellum, belli, a neuter noun of the 2nd declension. Belli means of war. A nation's casus belli involves direct offences or threats against it, whereas a nation's casus foederis involves offences or threats to an ally nation or nations—usually one with which it has a mutual defence pact, such as NATO.[2][3]

The term came into wide use in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries through the writings of Hugo Grotius (1653), Cornelius van Bynkershoek (1707), and Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui (1732), among others, and due to the rise of the political doctrine of jus ad bellum or "just war theory".[4][5] The term is also used informally to refer to any "just cause" a nation may claim for entering into a conflict. It is used retrospectively to describe situations that arose before the term came into wide use, as well as being used to describe present-day situations—even those in which war has not been formally declared.

In formally articulating a casus belli, a government typically lays out its reasons for going to war, its intended means of prosecuting the war, and the steps that others might take to dissuade it from going to war. It attempts to demonstrate that it is going to war only as a last resort (ultima ratio) and that it has "just cause" for doing so. Modern international law recognizes only three lawful justifications for waging war: self-defense  defence of an ally required by the terms of a treaty, and approval by the United Nations.”

“SkyWave Mobile Communications (“SkyWave”) is a global provider of satellite and satellite-cellular devices in the Machine-to-Machine (M2M) market. SkyWave's products allow customers to track, monitor and control industrial vehicles, vessels and industrial equipment. Applications include tracking the location of vehicle fleets, monitoring data from oil & gas flow meters and turning on and off pumps. More examples of applications can be found in the Market section.

SkyWave’s satellite products communicate via Inmarsat's global satellite service. [1] .[2] The main industries their products are used in are the transportation, maritime, mining, oil & gas, heavy equipment, emergency management, water monitoring, and utilities sectors. 

History[edit]

SkyWave Mobile Communications was founded in Ottawa, Canada in 1997. In its initial stages, SkyWave relied on the research and technical expertise provided by the Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC) and local government funding services to develop the first product.[3]

Some examples of SkyWave products in use include government vehicles in USA,[4] tuna buoys in the Pacific, truck tracking in the jungles of Brazil, the oil & gas industry in North America, and drinking water control in the UK.[5] In addition, SkyWave’s satellite terminals have been used to track races such as Rhino Charge 2011,[6] the Dubai-Muscat Offshore Sailing Race in 2008[7] and the China Sea Race from Hong Kong to Subic Bay in 2006.[8]

On April 1, 2009, Inmarsat acquired a 19% stake in SkyWave Mobile Communications to expand presence in the SLDR (Satellite Low Data Rate) market. SkyWave used the funds to acquire GlobalWave and double its size.[9][10] The SLDR market is estimated at $600m and is expected to grow.[11]

In December 2009, SkyWave launched a GLONASS-compatible product for the Russian market. The DMR-800L with GLONASS/GPS can use either or both of the navigation systems to determine location.[12].. SkyWave sells terminals to Solution Providers who put satellite communications products and services into industry-specific applications for their customers. The following are some of the main uses for this technology: 

Transportation Applications:[1]
Vehicle tracking and monitoring, fleet management
Security and anti-theft monitoring
Heavy equipment security and management[15]
Trailer and container tracking, rail car tracking
Cold Chain Management
Mining Applications:
Heavy equipment and machine tracking[16]
Remote installation sensor monitoring[17]
Water management
Maritime applications:[1]
Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT)[18][19]
Ship Security Alerting System (SSAS)
Vessel monitoring system (VMS)[20]
Vessel equipment, environment, security monitoring
Commercial fishing boat and leisure marine tracking[21]
Merchant marine monitoring
Buoy sensor monitoring and tracking
Oil & Gas Applications:[22]
Oil & gas pipeline and critical parameters monitoring and control [23] [24]
Cathodic protection
SCADA equipment monitoring and management
Fluids monitoring
Electric power valves monitoring and contra
Environmental monitoring 
Defence and Security Applications:[22]
Personnel tracking
Perimeter control
Homeland and border security
Blue Force Tracking, protection, monitoring, and security
Utilities Applications:
Water quality and quantity monitoring
Water regulation and control
Real-time analysis and monitoring
Emergency response alerts
Metering[25]
Emergency Management
Fleet tracking Siren warning system[26]”

“A coded modulation design for the INMARSAT geostationary GLONASS augmentation

A coded modulation scheme is proposed to carry out the Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) geostationary augmentation which includes both integrity and navigation functions over the next generation International Maritime Satellite Organization (INMARSAT) satellites. A baseline coded modulation scheme for the GLONASS augmentation broadcast proposes a forward error correction code over a differential phase shift keying (DPSK) modulation. The use of a concatenated code over the same signaling is considered. The proposed coded modulation design is more powerful and robust, yet not overly more complex in system implementation than the baseline scheme. Performance results of concatenated codes over a DPSK signaling used in the design are presented. The sensitivity analysis methodology in selecting the coded modulation scheme is also discussed

Published in:

Military Communications Conference, 1991. MILCOM '91, Conference Record, Military Communications in a Changing World., IEEE
Date of Conference:
4-7 Nov 1991
Page(s):
321 - 325 vol.1
Meeting Date :
04 Nov 1991-07 Nov 1991
Print ISBN:
0-87942-691-8 
INSPEC Accession Number:
4269315”

McConnell reminds Serco’s Blue-Bait Red-Switch Canada actors in the Global Guardian and Cope Tiger war games that the mills of the gods grind slow but they grind exceeding small.


Yours sincerely,


Field McConnell, United States Naval Academy, 1971; Forensic Economist; 30 year airline and 22 year military pilot; 23,000 hours of safety; Tel: 715 307 8222

David Hawkins Tel: 604 542-0891 Forensic Economist; former leader of oil-well blowA-out teams; now sponsors Grand Juries in CSI Crime and Safety Investigation

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