Saturday, July 19, 2014

#2038: Marine Links Serco Baginski to Patsy Offender’s Tag, SIMAS Times and MH Extortion 17

Plum City – ( United States Marine Field McConnell has linked Serco director Maureen Baginski to the deployment of patsies by the U.K. Offender’s Tag Association, the times of asset movements through various pre-positioned crime scenes logged by the U.S. Security Incident Management Analysis System (SIMAS) and the murders of passengers on MH Flight 17 in east Ukraine on July 17 2014 and the Extortion 17 CH-47 helicopter in Afghanistan on 6 August 2011.

Noting that in late June, the Voice of Russia claimed Donetsk rebels captured a Ukrainian base containing Buk missile launchers, McConnell alleges that former NSA / FBI intelligence director Baginski deployed Serco-tagged offenders at SIMAS times so Cameron and Obama could blame the MH 17 crash on Putin-armed rebels and the Extortion 17 crash on Taliban who got lucky with three RPGs.

Prequel 1: #2037: Marine Links Serco's Boeing-Missile Waypoint to Obama’s Red Switch Wag the Dog and SIMAS Times for Buk

Cameron, Obama Meeting on Weighty Issues

David Cameron on 'Appalling' MH17 Crash - 18/07/2014

Fox & Friends Rage Over Obama 38 Seconds Dedicated to 
Malaysia Airlines MH17

Dirty Harry Do You ( I ) Feel Lucky Punk? ( high quality ) 

Britain and America implicate Russia in Flight MH17 missile attack
Both David Cameron and Barack Obama call for Mr Putin to allow the crash site to be 'properly investigated' amid reports separatists were denying investigators access
By Steven Swinford, Peter Dominiczak and Tom Parfitt
11:16PM BST 18 Jul 2014
Britain and America have implicated Russia in the “unspeakable” missile attack on Flight MH17 as diplomatic relations reached their lowest point since the Cold War.

Barack Obama, the US president, described the deaths of nearly 300 people as an “outrage” as he issued a stark warning to Vladimir Putin, his Russian counterpart, for supporting the separatists who are thought to have fired the missile.

David Cameron, the Prime Minister, said it was an “appalling, shocking, horrific” incident and added that “those responsible must be held to account”.

Both leaders called for Mr Putin to allow the crash site to be “properly investigated” amid reports that armed separatists were denying investigators access.

On a day of fast-moving developments and growing recriminations between the East and the West:

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- Mr Putin was accused of avoiding phone calls from world leaders including Mr Cameron;

- America was last night considering imposing further sanctions as Mr Obama warned that he was prepared to “increase the costs” to Russia;

- Footage emerged of a Buk anti-aircraft missile launcher being driven into rebel-held Torez in eastern Ukraine just two hours before the crash.

- Video and audio emerged purporting to contain footage of Russian-backed, rebels saying they had mistakenly shot down the jet.

- Mr Putin categorically denied any link to the attack and suggested that Ukraine was partly responsible. “This tragedy would not have happened if there was peace in the country,” he said.

- Britain sent air accident investigators to Ukraine along with specialist police to retrieve and repatriate corpses.

At the White House, Mr Obama suggested that the missile launcher used to shoot down the plane was from Russia, and that those who fired it may have been trained in Russia.

He said: “Nearly 300 innocent lives were taken, men, women, children, infants who had nothing to do with the crisis in Ukraine. Their deaths are an outrage of unspeakable proportions.

“A group of separatists can’t shoot down military transport planes without sophisticated equipment and sophisticated training, and that is coming from Russia.”

Challenging Mr Putin to stop supplying the arms to the separatists, he said: “The violence that is taking place there is facilitated in large part because of Russian support and they have the ability to move those separatists in a different direction. If Mr Putin makes a decision that we are not going to allow heavy armaments and the flow of fighters into Ukraine across the Ukrainian-Russian border then it will stop.”

Mr Cameron said: “It is an absolutely appalling, shocking, horrific incident that has taken place. We have got to get to the bottom of what happened, and how this happened. If as seems possible this was brought down then those responsible must be held to account. We must lose no time in doing that.”

Sir Kim Darroch, the Prime Minister’s national security adviser, chaired an emergency meeting with officials from across Whitehall, including police and representatives from the intelligence agencies, to assess the situation.

A No 10 spokesman said: “While it is too early to be categoric about the cause of the disaster, the growing weight of evidence suggests that MH17 was shot down by a surface-to-air missile and that this was fired from near Torez, in territory controlled by the separatists.”

According to reports, a unit of heavily armed rebels has cordoned off a large section of the crash site and is denying access to international investigators.

A Downing Street spokesman said: “This investigation must be swift, transparent and credible. Six investigators from the UK Air Accident Investigation Branch will arrive in Kiev tomorrow to provide assistance.”

Mark Lyall Grant, Britain’s ambassador to the UN, said: “We urge Russia to reflect on the situation it has created, of destabilising a neighbouring country. Let us hear today a clear and unequivocal condemnation from Russia of these armed groups.”

Crashed MH17 flight 'was 300 miles off typical course'
MH17 flight feared to have been shot down over Ukraine was taking a significantly different route to the usual course for flights from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, according to aviation expert.

By Tom Brooks-Pollock, and Edward Malnick
10:25AM BST 18 Jul 2014
The crashed MH17 flight took a route 300 miles to the north of its usual path, an aviation expert has said.

Robert Mark, a commercial pilot who edits Aviation International News Safety magazine, said that most Malaysia Airlines flights from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur normally travelled along a route significantly further south than the plane which crashed.

Malaysia Airlines has insisted its plane travelled on an "approved route" used by many other carriers.

But Mr Mark said: "I can only tell you as a commercial pilot myself that if we had been routed that way, with what's been going on in the Ukraine and the Russian border over the last few weeks and months, I would never have accepted that route.

"I went into the FlightAware system, which we all use these days to see where airplanes started and where they tracked, and I looked back at the last two weeks' worth of MH17 flights, which was this one.

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"And the flight today tracked very, very much further north into the Ukraine than the other previous flights did … there were MH17 versions that were 300 miles south of where this one was."

Records of recent MH17 flights on the FlightAware appear to bear out Mr Mark's claim, with earlier flights significantly further south than the flight that crashed.

Mr Mark’s intervention came amid mounting questions over why passenger jets were flying over the war zone three months after pilots were warned to avoid it.

Aviation safety authorities in America and Europe warned pilots in April about potential risks flying in or near Ukraine airspace.

Experts claimed that operators continued to fly across the zone because it was the quickest and cheapest route for some flights.

Norman Shanks, a former head of group security at the BAA airports group, said: "Malaysia Airlines, like a number of other carriers, has been continuing to use it because it is a shorter route, which means less fuel and therefore less money."

Attacks on aircraft in the area have been rife. In the past week alone two Ukrainian military aircraft were shot down and a third was damaged by a missile.

Eurocontrol, which coordinates European air traffic control, said Ukrainian authorities had now closed all routes in the east of the country.

A spokesman for Malaysia Airlines said: "This route is an approved route. 15 out of 16 airlines use this route. It's a safe route - most other countries use this route.

"So we were not given any notice to change this."

David Cameron urges those responsible for downing jet to be 'held to account'”

“U.S. Embassies: World Wide Spy Platform
By Wayne Madsen -Via: Online Journal
With revelations that U.S. embassies in Oslo, Copenhagen, and Stockholm have carried out spying operations against the host citizens of Norway, Denmark, and Sweden from the respective embassies, comes news to WMR that the system carrying out the secret surveillance — the Security Incident Management Analysis System or SIMAS – not only also spies on citizens of the two Nordic partners of Norway, Denmark, and Sweden, namely Iceland and Finland, from U.S. embassies in Reykjavik and Helsinki, respectively, but spies on individuals from all U.S. embassies and consulates around the world — from Santiago, Chile, and Canberra, Australia, to Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, to Maputo, Mozambique. The Finnish paper, Helsingin Sanomat, is reporting that the Finnish Security Police (SUPO) has asked U.S. authorities about the activities of SIMAS in Helsinki. One nation that has adopted a sanguine reaction to the U.S. embassy spy program is Denmark, described by one intelligence insider as a “zone of control” for U.S. surveillance activities in Scandinavia. The cooperation between the U.S. and Denmark in surveillance operations began under Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen and it was one of the reasons he was rewarded by Washington with the job of Secretary General of NATO.

The Norwegian and Swedish governments have demanded answers to questions from U.S. authorities about SIMAS spying but State Department spokesman P. J. Crowley, a retired Air Force colonel who has historically been assigned by the CIA to oversee the Clintons, whether at the White House or, now, at the State Department, claimed that the government of Norway had been informed by the United States of SIMAS surveillance from a Surveillance Detection Unit (SDU) located in a building near the U.S. embassy in Oslo.

On November 4, Crowley was asked at a State Department press conference about his earlier statement that Norway had been informed about SIMAS. The question and answer session:

“Q . . . on Monday when I asked you, you said that the Norwegian Government was aware of these activities. They say they are not. So who’s lying here?”

A. “I’m, we, the security of our Embassy involves cooperation between our security officials and Norwegian security officials. Ill just stand by those words.”

Q. “But why have you hired a building outside Norwegian your Embassy in Norway, in Oslo, and filled it with Norwegian police officers and also Norwegian military officers?” A. “That’s a better question to ask our Embassy. I haven’t been there in a while, so I can’t provide you any insight.”

Q. “But just to follow up. But both the State Department in Norway and also the Justice Department in Norway said they’re not aware that you have some activities outside your Embassy building. Why haven’t you informed the Norwegian Government?”

A. “Well, look, embassy diplomatic posts all over the world are ripe targets for a terrorist attack, whether they’re U.S. embassies, whether they are the embassies of other governments. It is right and proper that we would take appropriate steps to protect our diplomatic posts anywhere around the world, and we would expect any government to do the same, whether it’s somewhere over out overseas or here in the United States. So we have a program [SIMAS] where we look carefully to make to evaluate if we believe our Embassy is under observation and potentially under threat. We share that information across the United States Government. But as appropriate, we share that information with our host government partners. The essence of addressing this challenge which confronts the United States and other countries in the West is the very kind of intelligence cooperation and law enforcement cooperation that has been a hallmark of our alliances for a number of years. So how much the host nation government knows about specific activities, I can’t say. But everything that we do is fully consistent with our security arrangements that we have with any host nation government anywhere in the world, including Norway.”

Q. “Can I just follow up? Is there written agreements about this –”

A. “I can’t say. At this point, I would just defer further questions back to our Embassy in Norway.”

Media reports that U.S. embassy spying on civilians has been going on for the past 10 years, since 2000. A State Department Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) submitted on January 5, 2010, states “The Security Incident Management and Analysis System (SIMAS) is a worldwide Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS) web-based application, which serves as a repository for all suspicious activity and crime reporting from U.S. Diplomatic Missions abroad (all U.S. embassies and consulates). Department of State personnel, including Diplomatic Security personnel, regional security officers, and cleared foreign nationals, enter Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) into SIMAS as a central repository for all physical security incidents overseas. SIMAS Reports typically contain a detailed narrative description of the suspicious activity prompting the report, available suspicious person(s) and vehicle descriptors, and other identification data as may be available (e.g. photographs). Reports also indicate date, time and location of suspicious activity, and may include amplifying comments from relevant Bureau offices.” In other words, SIMAS is global and, in some cases, cleared nationals of foreign nations have access to the SIMAS system. The State Department was recruiting local foreign nationals to work with SIMAS in Accra, Ghana; Bujumbura, Burundi; and Sydney, Australia. Even U.S. citizens abroad are subjected to being subjected to spying by SIMAS. The PIA also states: “SIMAS collects and maintains the following types of PII [personally-identifiable information]on members of the public, foreign nationals, U.S. government employees, and contractors who are identified as being directly or indirectly involved in or associated with suspicious activities and/or criminal allegations near USG property. All types of information may not be collected on each specific group of individuals. However, it may be possible for all forms of PII to be collected on an individual.”

Translating the government gobbledygook language, while SIMAS is not authorized to collect certain types of data on groups or individuals, when it comes to each individual, anything is fair game.

At the very least, SIMAS contains data on: gender, race, height, weight, eye color, skin tone, hair color, hair style, images, age or estimated age, body type (build), scars, marks, tattoos, name, address, date of birth, telephone number, father’s name, and mother’s name, citizenship status and Information.

SIMAS data is also shared with the Central Intelligence Agency, Department of Homeland Security, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Justice, Department of Agriculture, Department of Treasury, Department of Defense (including the National Security Agency), National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Health and Human Services, the Capitol Police, and all other US embassies and consulates around the world.

Although the PIA states that SIMAS data is retained by the Diplomatic Security Bureau according to a set retention schedule and is not shared for purposes other than crime and terrorism prevention, the same cannot be said for the other agencies that access and retain SIMAS data, including the CIA, FBI, and NSA.

The State Department PIA concludes that “SIMAS has been designed to minimize risk to privacy data.” That is hard to believe considering the global access permitted to the system, as well as the fact that not only do a dozen or more U.S. agencies have access to the data but so also do foreign nationals.

So, if you are in Winnipeg or Warsaw, Lusaka or Lisbon, or Malabo or Paramaribo, and you stroll past the U.S. embassy or consulate, “smile, you’re on clandestine camera and now in the SIMAS database.”

- See more at:

“Department of State Magazine: National Visa Center The Department of State puts out a monthly publication highlighting work and stories of their teams. In the May issue, the support that Serco provides at the National Visa Center in Portsmouth New Hampshire is highlighted as the "Office of the Month". Click here to read the clipping from magazine.”

Yours sincerely,

Field McConnell, United States Naval Academy, 1971; Forensic Economist; 30 year airline and 22 year military pilot; 23,000 hours of safety; Tel: 715 307 8222

David Hawkins Tel: 604 542-0891 Forensic Economist; former leader of oil-well blow-out teams; now sponsors Grand Juries in CSI Crime and Safety Investigation

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