Tuesday, August 26, 2014

#2084: Marine Links Ladbroke's to White's Serco Crime Times, Di and Dando spot-fixed Hits

Plum City – (AbelDanger.net). United States Marine Field McConnell has linked the bookmaker Ladbroke's to the timelines of crimes apparently staged for the enrichment of White's Club gamblers and Serco investors and the alleged spot-fixed murders (contract hits) of Princess Diana in Paris in 1997 and BBC Crimewatch presenter Jill Dando in London in 1999.



McConnell claims Ladbroke's pays vigs to killers hired through the Offender's Tag Association and he notes that White's member Nicholas Soames gave Serco an MoD contract to operate the National Physical Laboratory's GPS clock – an essential tool for spot-fixing of crime-scene times such as the moment defined for Princess Di's Mercedes to hit the 13th column of the Pont d'Alma tunnel or for Jill Dando's head to take a bullet on the porch of her Fulham home just before she could put her keys in the lock to open the front door.

McConnell claims that Ladbroke's agents arranged the Di-Dando hits to silence whistleblowers who might otherwise have exposed the role of White's and Serco in spot-fixing crime times and a pedophile blackmail ring launched by the BBC's late Jimmy Savile out of the Langham Hotel opposite Broadcasting House.



Cliff Richard in A Song For Jill Dando

The Real Killers of Jill Dando

Crimewatch UK June 1999

Proof that Princess Diana Was Killed by Illuminati Assassins Part I by J. Parra

""As Dando was about to put her keys in the lock to open the front door of her home in Fulham, she was grabbed from behind. With his right arm, the assailant held her and forced her to the ground, so that her face was almost touching the tiled step of the porch. Then, with his left hand, he fired a single shot at her left temple, killing her instantly. The bullet entered her head just above her ear, parallel to the ground, and came out the right side of her head."

— Bob Woffinden, The Guardian, July 2002."

by SUE REID  Last updated at 09:30 25 September 2007

Over English tea served in fine china cups at a sumptuous Paris apartment last November, an astonishing meeting took place to discuss the death of 36-year-old Diana, Princess of Wales.

The conversation was cordial. A butler carrying a teapot and tray of delicate sandwiches moved smoothly between the guests in the richly decorated drawing room of a building owned by the British Government, near the famous Champs Elysees.

In one Victorian armchair sat Lord Stevens, the respected former head of Scotland Yard. He had just finished a three-year investigation called Operation Paget into whether there was a conspiracy to murder the most famous woman in the world ten years ago and a cover-up to hide the truth."

The Princess was travelling with her Muslim lover Dodi Fayed in a Mercedes car when it smashed into the 13th column of the Pont D'Alma road tunnel in Paris at 12.23am on Sunday, August 31, 1997."

"The Langham was designed by John Giles and built between 1863 and 1865 at a cost of £300,000.[1] It was then the largest and most modern hotel in the city, featuring a hundred water closets, thirty-six bathrooms and the first hydraulic lifts in England. The opening ceremony on 16 June was performed by the Prince of Wales. After the original company was liquidated during an economic slump, new management acquired the hotel for little more than half of its construction cost, and it soon became a commercial success. In 1867,[2] a former Union officer named James Sanderson was appointed general manager and the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon IIIOscar Wilde,Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Electric light was installed in the entrance and courtyard at the exceptionally early date of 1879, and Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as A Scandal in Bohemia and The Sign of Four partly at the Langham.

The Langham continued throughout the 20th century to be a favoured spot with members of the royal family, such as Diana, Princess of Wales, and many high profile politicians including Winston Churchill and Charles de Gaulle.[3] Other guests included Noël CowardWallis SimpsonDon Bradman, Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia and Ayumi Hamasaki.

The Langham was hard hit by the Great Depression and the owners attempted to sell the site to the BBC, but Broadcasting House was built across Portland Place instead. During World War II, the hotel was used in part by the Army until it was damaged by bombs and forced to close. After the war, it was occupied by the BBC as ancillary accommodation to Broadcasting House, and the corporation purchased it outright in 1965.

One BBC employee who stayed at the Langham was Guy Burgess, one of the 'Cambridge Five', a spying ring who fed official secrets to the Soviets during the Cold War. A BBC internal memo reveals that upon being unable to access his room in the hotel late one night, Burgess attempted to break down the door with a fire extinguisher.[4]

The handsome pillared Palm Court became the reference library, and the restaurant a staff bar and refreshment room.[5] In 1980, the BBC unsuccessfully applied for planning permission to demolish the building and replace it with an office development designed by Norman FosterIn 1986, the BBC sold the property to the Ladbroke Group, who later purchased the non-US Hilton Hotels, for £26 million and eventually reopened the hotel as the Langham Hilton in 1991 after a £100 million refurbishment. New owners extended the hotel and carried out other refurbishments between 1998 and 2000. Further renovation took place between 2004 and 2009, at an estimated cost of £80 million, bringing the hotel back to the status of its grand past and maintaining the quintessential English feel and level of sophistication of its early days."

"December 9, 2012 4:49 pm
Time called on Serco's NPL contract By Gill Plimmer

Serco, the FTSE 100 outsourcing company, has lost its contract to run the National Physical Laboratory – which built the first atomic clock – after the government said it would seek academic partners to take over the centre instead.

The laboratory has been managed by Serco on a profit-share basis since 1994. But David Willetts, science minister, has decided that the government can "encourage greater interaction with businesses" by ending the contract in March 2014 [Now you know why MH Flight 370 was disappeared], when the company's 17-year tenure comes to an end."

Yours sincerely,

Field McConnell, United States Naval Academy, 1971; Forensic Economist; 30 year airline and 22 year military pilot; 23,000 hours of safety; Tel: 715 307 8222

David Hawkins Tel: 604 542-0891 Forensic Economist; former leader of oil-well blow-out teams; now sponsors Grand Juries in CSI Crime and Safety Investigation

No comments:

Post a Comment

Who's visiting Abel Danger
view a larger version of the map below at whos.amung.us

You Too can be a CAPTAIN SHERLOCK