Thursday, September 24, 2015

#2461: Carly 8(a) Pope on Onion Route – Dave’s Day of Jackal Bets – Serco Dirtbox Hits

A Request by United States Marine Field McConnell 
for 
Images Leading To A Proof by Contradiction Of Assertions Below 
Plum City Online - (AbelDanger.net
September 24, 2015

1. AD ASSERTS THAT CARLY FIORINA'S HP 8(A) PROTÉGÉES ARE TRACKING POPE FRANCIS ON THE NAVY'S ONION ROUTER (TOR) which HP refined to link guests and staff at elite hotels with peer or common access cards for nearby crime scenes.

2. AD ASSERTS THAT DAVID 'RAVEY DAVE' CAMERON AND HIS WHITE'S CLUB ASSOCIATES BET ON DEATH POOLS WHEREBY DAY OF THE JACKAL ASSASSINS scoop the pot on delivery of a time-stamped money shot of a victim's death.

3. AD ASSERTS THAT SERCO'S FAA CONTRACT TOWERS OPERATIVES HAVE BEEN USING DIRTBOXES DEVELOPED IN A 'MARRIAGE' BETWEEN THE CIA AND U.S. MARSHALS to track target cell phones before synchronized death-bet hits.

United States Marine Field McConnell (http://www.abeldanger.net/2010/01/field-mcconnell-bio.html) is writing an e-book "Shaking Hands With the Devil's Clocks" and invites readers to e-mail him images (examples below) for a proof by contradiction of the three assertions above.

Trailer The Day of the Jackal [Jackal is modeled on the late David Stirling, founder of the SAS and Long Range Desert Group, White’s Club gambler and strangler and the probable handler of 'Fireball' Files on JFK]
 

Hillary, the pig had a mouth this big! We kept the hotel kiddie-porn pics and then we set up Serco for White'$ on 9/11! 

Schematic of 8(a) peer-privacy onion router device with patent assigned to Carly Fiorina's HP

Fiorina plans to put 50 Army brigades, 36 Marine Corps battalions and up to 350 naval ships under the control of HP's 8(a) operatives of Tor on the Navy/Marine Corps Intranet.


The Mayfair Set episode 1- Who Pays Wins 
 

"The Opinion Pages | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR 
The Prime Minister Did What With a Pig's Head? 
By HARI KUNZRUSEPT. 23, 2015 … 
The image of Britain’s poshest prime minister since Sir Alec Douglas-Home in the '60s engaging in what, I suppose, is technically termed necrozoophilia at a semi-secret ball full of druggy cross-dressers only confirms Middle England's suppressed fears and fantasies about life at the top. They have always suspected that behind closed doors, the toffs were getting away with murder. They only wish they could be murderers, too."

"The Day of the Jackal (1971) is a thriller novel by English writer Frederick Forsyth about a professional assassin who is contracted by the OAS, a French dissident paramilitary organisation, to kill Charles de Gaulle, the President of France. .. The book begins in 1962 with the (historical) failed attempt on de Gaulle's life planned by Col. Jean-Marie Bastien-Thiry in the Paris suburb of Petit-Clamart: Operation Charlotte Corday. Following Bastien-Thiry's arrest, the French security forces wage a short but extremely vicious "underground" war with the terrorists of the OAS, a militant right-wing group who have labelled de Gaulle a traitor to France after his grant of independence to Algeria. The French secret service, particularly its covert operations directorate (the "Action Service"), is remarkably effective in infiltrating the terrorist organisation with their own informants, allowing them to kidnap and neutralise the terrorists' chief of operations, Antoine Argoud. The failure of the Petit-Clamart assassination, and a subsequent attempt at the École Militaire, coupled with Bastien-Thiry's eventual execution by firing squad, likewise cripple the morale of the terrorists.

Argoud's deputy, Lt. Col. Marc Rodin, carefully examines their few remaining options and determines that the only way to succeed in killing de Gaulle is to hire a professional assassin from outside the organisation, someone completely unknown to both the French authorities and the OAS itself. After inquiries, he contacts an Englishman (his name is never given) [modeled on David Stirling and his White's Club SAS associates], who meets with Rodin and his two principal deputies in Vienna, and agrees to assassinate de Gaulle for the sum of $500,000 (approximately $2.87 million in 2013). The four men agree on his code name, "The Jackal." The three OAS leaders then take up residency on the top floor of a Rome hotel guarded by a group of ex-legionnaires to avoid the risk of being captured like Argoud.

The remainder of Part One describes the Jackal's exhaustive preparations for the assassination. He first acquires a legitimate British passport under a false name, under which he plans to operate for the majority of his mission. He eventually steals the passports of two foreign tourists visiting London who superficially resemble him for use in an emergency. Using his primary false passport, the Jackal travels to Brussels, where he commissions a specialised sniper rifle of great slimness and an appropriate silencer along with a small supply of explosive bulletsfrom a master gunsmith, as well as a set of forged French identity papers from a master forger. The latter makes the mistake of attempting to blackmail him, for which the Jackal breaks his neck and locks his body in a large trunk where he (correctly) guesses it will not be found for a long time. After exhaustively researching a series of books and articles by, and about, de Gaulle, the Jackal travels to Paris to reconnoitre the most favourable spot and the best possible day for the assassination.

After orchestrating a series of armed robberies in France, the OAS is able to deposit the first half of the Jackal's fee in his bank in Switzerland [HSBC]. At the same time, the French secret service, curious about Rodin and his subordinates being holed up in the hotel, fake a letter that lures one of Rodin's bodyguards to France, where he is captured and tortured to death [Christopher Stevens]. Interpreting his incoherent ramblings, the secret service is able to piece together Rodin's plot, but knows nothing of the assassin himself bar his codename.

When told about the plot, de Gaulle (who was notoriously careless of his personal safety) refuses to cancel any public appearances, modify his normal routines, or even allow any kind of public inquiry into the assassin's whereabouts to be made: any investigation, he orders, must be done in absolute secrecy.”" 

"Firms vie to overhaul Navy's intranet 
By AUSTIN WRIGHT 04/25/12, 10:33 PM EDT NORFOLK, Va. — The Navy is preparing to overhaul one of the world’s largest computer networks, despite congressional concerns. And technology firms are ramping up their lobbying campaigns to get a piece of the action.

The multibillion-dollar project — the Next Generation Enterprise Network program, or NGEN — would replace the Navy Marine Corps Intranet, which links hundreds of thousands of military computers across the United States and Japan. The project's goal is to develop an improved system that gives the Navy and Marine Corps more control over the network and its data, which are currently managed by a private contractor, HP Enterprise Services.

HP took over the network in 2008 when it bought out the original contract holder, Electronic Data Systems. And in 2010, HP won a $3.4 billion continuity-of-services contract to manage the system through 2015 — and to help the Navy transition to its replacement network, NGEN."

"Epic Failure Businesslady Carly Fiorina To Do For America What She Did For Hewlett Packard: Almost Kill It 
by Kaili Joy Gray 
Mar 30 10:51 am 2015 Carly Fiorina, who will never be president but who is still putting on quite the show of pretending she just might be — said on "Fox News Sunday" there's a "higher than 90 percent" chance she'll run in 2016, which means there's a higher than 90 percent chance we should all gird our loins in giddy anticipation of "Demon Sheep II: The Sheepening."

"CIA Aided Program to Spy on U.S. Cellphones 
Marshals Service uses airborne devices that mimic cell towers to scan data on thousands of cellphones 
By DEVLIN BARRETT Updated March 10, 2015 7:39 p.m. ET WASHINGTON—The Central Intelligence Agency played a crucial role in helping the Justice Department develop technology that scans data from thousands of U.S. cellphones at a time, part of a secret high-tech alliance between the spy agency and domestic law enforcement, according to people familiar with the work.

The CIA and the U.S. Marshals Service, an agency of the Justice Department, developed technology to locate specific cellphones in the U.S. through an airborne device that mimics a cellphone tower, these people said.

Today, the Justice Department program, whose existence was reported by The Wall Street Journal last year, is used to hunt criminal suspects. The same technology is used to track terror suspects and intelligence targets overseas, the people said.

The program operates specially equipped planes that fly from five U.S. cities, with a flying range covering most of the U.S. population. Planes are equipped with devices—some past versions were dubbed "dirtboxes" by law-enforcement officials—that trick cellphones into reporting their unique registration information.

The surveillance system briefly identifies large numbers of cellphones belonging to citizens unrelated to the search. The practice can also briefly interfere with the ability to make calls, these people said.

Some law-enforcement officials are concerned the aerial surveillance of cellphone signals inappropriately mixes traditional police work with the tactics and technology of overseas spy work that is constrained by fewer rules. Civil-liberties groups say the technique amounts to a digital dragnet of innocent Americans' phones.

The CIA has a long-standing prohibition that bars it from conducting most types of domestic operations, and officials at both the CIA and the Justice Department said they didn’t violate those rules. The cooperation began a decade ago, when the CIA arranged for the Marshals Service to receive more than $1 million in gear to conduct such surveillance, said people familiar with the program. More than $100 million went into research and development of the devices.

For years, the U.S. Marshals' Technical Operations Group worked with the CIA’s Office of Technical Collection to develop the technology. In the early days it was the CIA that provided the most resources, said the people familiar with the matter. The CIA gave the Marshals Service the ability to conduct what officials called "silent stimulation" of cellphones. By using a device that mimics a cell tower, all phones in its range are compelled to send identifying information. When the device finds a target phone in that sea of information, the plane circles overhead until the device can locate it to within about 3 yards.

Some versions of the technology also can be used to intercept signals from phones, these people said. U.S. military and intelligence agencies have used the technology in Afghanistan, Iraq, and elsewhere to hunt terrorists, and map the use of cellphones in such places, according to people familiar with the work.

The cooperation between technical experts at the CIA and the Marshals Service, which law-enforcement officials have described as a "marriage," represents one way criminal investigators are increasingly relying on U.S. intelligence agencies for operational support and technical assistance in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Many Justice Department officials view the joint effort with the CIA as having made valuable contributions to both domestic and overseas operations.

A CIA spokesman declined to comment on whether the CIA or any other agency uses the devices. Some technologies developed by the agency "have been lawfully and responsibly shared with other U.S. government agencies," the spokesman said. "How those agencies use that technology is determined by the legal authorities that govern the operations of those individual organizations—not CIA." He also said the relationship between the Marshals Service and CIA tech experts couldn’t be characterized as a marriage.

The Justice Department, which oversees the Marshals Service, would neither confirm nor deny the existence of such technology, saying that doing so would tip off criminals.

A Justice Department spokesman said Marshals Service techniques are "carried out consistent with federal law, and are subject to court approval." The agency doesn’t conduct “domestic surveillance, intelligence gathering, or any type of bulk data collection,” the spokesman said, adding that it doesn’t gather any intelligence on behalf of U.S. spy agencies.

To civil libertarians, the close involvement of America's premier international spy agency with a domestic law-enforcement arm shows how military and espionage techniques are now being used on U.S. citizens.

"There's a lot of privacy concerns in something this widespread, and those concerns only increase if we have an intelligence agency coordinating with them,” said Andrew Crockerof the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which has filed a lawsuit seeking more details about the program and its origins.

The Marshals Service program is now the subject of congressional inquiries. The top Republican and Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee have raised concerns about possible invasion of privacy and legal oversight of the operations. Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley (R., Iowa) said the Justice Department must provide answers about its use of the technology, “including the legal authority agencies obtain prior to deploying these tools, the specific information they are giving to judges when requesting to use them, and what policies are in place to ensure the civil liberties of innocent Americans are protected."

Concerns about how the Marshals Service uses the equipment grew among some officials last year after an incident in the Sinaloa area of Mexico. In that operation, several U.S. Marshals personnel were dressed as Mexican marines and carrying Mexican weapons as a Marshals plane circled overhead, searching for a suspect’s cellphone signal, according to people familiar with the operation.

As the men on the ground moved toward their target, they were fired on by drug-cartel suspects, and one of the Americans was badly wounded and airlifted to a hospital. The incident underscored for some law-enforcement officials the risks of such operations—that their personnel could be killed or possibly imprisoned while doing something that could be viewed as a crime in a foreign country. People familiar with the work say the agency conducts such operations roughly every few months, though each one is based on specific intelligence and needs.

The CIA and Marshals Service began field-testing one version of the device in 2004, said people familiar with the early years of the cooperation. That device worked on AT&T and T-Mobile phones, as well as most cellphones outside the U.S. As part of the joint work with the CIA, the Marshals Service received more than one of the devices at no cost. At the time, each unit had a price tag of more than $300,000, these people said.

In 2005, the CIA gave the Marshals Service technology to conduct "silent stimulation" of those types of cellphones, both for identifying them and, with a court order, intercepting the communications, these people said. The following year, the CIA and Marshals Service began field testing a way of cracking a different cellphone system used widely in the U.S., giving them the ability to identify phones on the Verizon and Sprint/Nextel networks. A Sprint spokeswoman declined to comment while the other phone companies didn't respond to requests for comment.

In 2008, the CIA arranged for the Marshals Service to receive without charge one of the new devices, which cost about $500,000 each, these people said. That year, they began field testing a new version that would work against the next generation of cellphones, according to people familiar with the work.

Write to Devlin Barrett at devlin.barrett@wsj.com"

"Increasing peer privacy 
US 7865715 B2 
ABSTRACT 
In a method for increasing peer privacy, a path for information is formed from a provider to a requestor through a plurality of peers in response to a received request for the information. Each peer of the plurality of peers receives a respective set-up message comprising of a predetermined label and an identity of a next peer for the information. The information is transferred over the path in a message, where the message comprises a message label configured to determine a next peer according to the path in response to the message label matching the previously received predetermined label.
Original Assignee: Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
"HP broadened our definition of a minority business in 2009. The main category of businesses our supplier diversity program supports are minority-owned, woman-owned, veteran-owned and small businesses. For the first time, we have included lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender-owned (LBGT-owned) businesses in the definition. Through our new sponsorship of, and collaboration with, the National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC), we will maintain a pipeline of potential LBGT-owned suppliers. In 2009, we also increased our sponsorship of women-owned businesses."
   
"White's is the oldest and most exclusive gentleman's club in London.[1] It is based at 37 St. James's Street in London.
Yemen meeting
White's was the venue for a meeting in around April 1963, which led to an unofficial British covert operation against the Egyptian-backed government of the Yemen. Those present included Foreign Secretary Alec Douglas-Home, Aviation Minister Julian AmeryNeil McLean and Brian Franks.[2]
Current and former members
Alfred Duff Cooper - Former chairman.[3]
Ian Cameron - Former chairman.[3]
David Cameron - resigned his membership.[12]"
 
"A dead pool, also known as a death pool, is a game of prediction which involves guessing when someone will die. Sometimes it is a bet where money is involved.[1] The combination of dead or death, and betting pool, refers to such a gambling arrangement.[clarification needed] …

In the early 20th century, death pools were popular in dangerous sports such as motorsport, for example the first edition of the Indianapolis 500.[2] Variants[edit] A typical modern dead pool might have players pick out celebrities who they think will die within the year. Most games start on January 1, and run for 12 months although there are some variations on game length and timing.[citation needed] 

 In 2000, website Fucked Company claimed to be a "dot-com dead pool" which invited users to predict the next Internet startups to fail during that era's dot com bust.[3] The site itself folded in 2007 after a long history as a target for strategic lawsuits against public participation by companies.[4]"

"The Navy/Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI) was a United States Department of the Navy program which provides a vast majority of information technology services for the entire Department, including the United States Navy and Marine Corps. …

On October 6, 2000, the NMCI contract was awarded to Electronic Data Systems (EDS), now HP Enterprise Services (HP).[11] Secretary of the Navy Gordon England summed up the Navy’s IT Environment prior to the commencement of NMCI: "We basically had 28 separate commands budgeting, developing, licensing, and operating IT autonomously. It was inefficient and from the larger Department perspective, produced results that were far from optimal."[12]

NMCI consolidated roughly 6,000 networks—some of which could not e-mail, let alone collaborate with each other—into a single integrated and secure IT environment. HP updated more than 100,000 desktop and laptop PCs in 2007.[13] The program also consolidated an ad hoc network of more than 8,000 applications to 500 in four years and 15,003 logistics and readiness systems to 2,759 over a two-year period.[14] Sub-contractors to HP include:

Apple Inc., Cisco, Dell, McAfee, Microsoft, Oracle Corporation, Sun Micro systems, and Symantec[15] Harris Corporation (which acquired Multimax formerly known as Netco Government Services and WAM! NET), which provided enterprise network infrastructure design and support until its contract expired in 2014.[16]

Verizon, which provides wide area network (WAN) connectivity.

HP also provides the security services once provided by Raytheon.

HP also has worked with more than 400 [8(a)] small businesses, with 5 percent for small disadvantaged businesses, 5 percent for women-owned small businesses and 1.5 percent for HUBZone small businesses. Since its inception, NMCI has exceeded the minimum 40% small business objective set for the contract.[17] NMCI quickly suffered some widely publicized setbacks, including rollout delays that caused HP financial losses.[18] Today, NMCI is described in documents from the Navy’s Chief Information Officer as “the core enterprise network for Navy and Marine Corps forces in the United States and Japan, providing secure access to integrated voice, video and data communications."[19]

In 2009 NMCI became the first network to deploy the Global Address List (GAL), a multiservice address list that increases interoperability by enabling Navy and Marine Corps users to access the Defense Information Systems Agency's Joint Enterprise Directory Services (JEDS) contact list.[20] Additional improvements to network performance are also underway with the deployment of the Network Operations Common Operating Picture (NetOps COP). The tool helps provide enhanced situational awareness via increased information sharing and collaboration to commanders by giving them a common picture of network performance. Commanders can see scheduled maintenance tasks and other issues impacting the network, giving them the option to defer work that might affect the flow of critical information from the battlefield.[21]

Work in 2008 has increased NMCI's ability to respond to security issues and the program was the first network to implement fully the Department of Defense information assurance standards in both classified and unclassified environments. Among the enhancements were the deployment of Websense content filtering, an information assurance tool designed to inspect and block inbound Web traffic containing malicious code with little impact to the user. According to NMCI public affairs, "Websense allows the Network Operational Commands to set a tailored blocking policy by content such as gambling, hate speech or adult content, rather than blocking specific sites or URLs only. This allows the network operators to block sites much more efficiently and outsources the fight against the growing amount of inappropriate content."[22]

According to the Navy, Websense enables users to block or unblock sites, based on emerging and/or dynamic threats. The NMCI blocking policy is determined by various operational commands, such as the Naval Network Warfare Command, and enforced by the Global Network Operations Center, based in Norfolk. Blocked sites are redirected to a notification page which then links to a page on NMCI's homeport Web site. On this site, a user can submit a request that a site be unblocked in order to support mission requirements.[22]

In addition, NMCI is upgrading existing servers with Bluecoat proxy servers, which provides better capacity and traffic management functions. According to NMCI's own data, a few users account for the majority of NMCI's bandwidth usage, mostly attributed to streaming internet radio and video. New servers will allow bandwidth usage monitoring, down to a command or user level.[22]

The security upgrades have been well received by the Navy. On March 31, 2009, Rear Admiral (Ret.) John A. Gauss, Acquisition Director for the NGEN System Program Office (SPO) said during a press conference that "NMCI is the most secure network within the Navy."[23]

The Navy and HP measure end user satisfaction through a series of quarterly satisfaction surveys. End user satisfaction has steadily improved, reaching a high of nearly 86% in February 2008, as compared to 80% in December 2006. This is largely due to the upgrade of nearly 112,000 desktop and laptop computers in 2007, and a combination of network enhancements that are improving speed and reliability. HP is on track to upgrade another 120,000 seats in 2008 at Navy and Marine Corps bases in the US and Asia.[3]

Working in tandem with the technology refresh are the virtualization efforts on the network. NMCI is on track to move from 2,700 servers down to roughly 300. The efforts are expected to save more than $1.6 million per year in electricity costs.[24] Additionally, the decrease in the number of servers being refreshed will lower the cost of updating the equipment, leading to a potential savings of at least $1.5 million over four years.[25]

A highlight of the Navy’s virtualization efforts was its win of InfoWorld's 2009 Green 15 Award, which honors 15 companies and/or organizations for their green IT projects.[26] Ted Samson, Senior Analyst for InfoWorld said of the honorees, "This year's Green 15 winners demonstrate, once again, that green IT projects can be a win-win proposition. These organizations have not only helped the planet by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, preserving trees, and keeping e-waste out of landfills. They've also reaped measurable business benefits, such as significantly lower electricity bills, fewer hardware refreshes, and postponed data center-expansion projects -- along with gains in efficiency and productivity."

In 2006, the NMCI program office was criticized for its annual customer-satisfaction surveys. Officials refuse to release the raw data, leading to accusations that their conclusions are overly sunny. One NMCI director, Rear Admiral James B. Godwin III, said releasing the results would challenge the "integrity of our data."

The Department of the Navy has shown no desire to scale back or cancel the program. On 24 March 2006 the Navy exercised its three-year, $3 billion option to extend the contract through September 2010.[1]

In April 2006, users began to log on with Common Access Cards (CACs), a smartcard-based logon system called the Cryptographic Log On (CLO). In October 2008, NMCI's prime contractor HP posted a set of procedures so Apple Mac users can access NMCI's public-facing Web services, such as the e-mail and calendar functions, using their CAC readers with their Macs. The workaround also works with other Defense Department CAC-enabled networks.[27] Alternatively, NMCI and all other CAC-authenicated DoD websites may be accessed using LPS-Public.

After early challenges, the Navy is pleased with the performance and security of the NMCI network. According to Capt. Tim Holland, program manager for the Navy’s Next Generation Enterprise Network (NGEN), "NMCI is very robust today—we have good security with it, very good performance."[19] In an interview the DoN CIO Robert J. Carey stated, "The plan is that NGEN will be in place before the NMCI contract expires because it is not a renewable contract. According to the Navy, NMCI will serve as the baseline from which it will transition to NGEN.[19]

The Navy's confidence in NMCI today marks a significant turnaround from the challenges cited in the GAO's report of December 2006. The report states that " NMCI has not met its two strategic goals—to provide information superiority and to foster innovation via interoperability and shared services." The document also goes on to evaluate HP’s performance, "GAO's analysis of available performance data, however, showed that the Navy had met only 3 of 20 performance targets (15 percent) associated with the program's goals and nine related performance categories."

In contrast are the more recent comments from Vice Adm. Harry B. Harris Jr., deputy chief of naval operations for communication networks (OPNAV N-6) and deputy chief information officer, Department of the Navy. "I believe that NMCI in 2008 is achieving much of what we had hoped NMCI would achieve. It's leveled the playing field for security. It's allowed us to do things like push security patches that go through the whole enterprise that’s on NMCI. If you look at NMCI historically, it was probably the first step for the Navy to move into what was then called Joint Vision 2010 and now is Joint Vision 2020. It's actually done that, and it's moving the Navy toward the U.S. Defense Department's goal of information superiority. So, I see a lot of good things with NMCI."[28]

NMCI works today and it continues to improve as user needs evolve and technology opportunities arise. During the final two years of the contract, technology initiatives included new hardware, applications, and services to support the Navy and Marine Corps’ advanced IT needs. HP will install more than 110,000 new laptops and desktops, and will push more upgrades to improve end-users' IT capabilities through upgraded machine capacity, new operating systems, and new service lines.[3]

 

"Colonel Sir Archibald David Stirling, DSO, OBE[2] (15 November 1915 – 4 November 1990) was a British mountaineer, World War II British Army officer, and the founder of the Special Air Service.

.. Life before the war[edit]

Stirling was born at his family's ancestral home, Keir Housein the parish of Lecropt, Perthshire. He was the son of Brigadier General Archibald Stirling, of Keir, and Margaret Fraser, daughter of Simon Fraser, the Lord Lovat, (a descendant of Charles II, King of Scots). His cousin was Simon Fraser, 15th Lord Lovat, and his grandparents were Sir William Stirling-Maxwell, 9th Baronet and Lady Anna Maria Leslie-Melville. Raised in the Roman Catholic faith of his mother, he was educated at the Benedictine Ampleforth College and Trinity College, Cambridge. A tall and athletic figure (he was 6 feet 6 inches (1.98 m) tall). He was training to climb Mount Everest when World War II broke out.
…. 

In North Africa, in the fifteen months before Stirling's capture, the SAS had destroyed over 250 aircraft on the ground, dozens of supply dumps, wrecked railways and telecommunications, and had put hundreds of enemy vehicles out of action. Field Marshal Montgomery described Stirling as "mad, quite mad" but admitted that men like Stirling were needed in time of war. According to John Aspinal, Stirling reputedly personally strangled 41 men.[5] Private military company[edit]

Worried that Britain was losing its power after the war, Stirling organised deals to provide British weapons and military personnel to other countries, like Saudi Arabia, for various privatised foreign policy operations.[5] Along with several associates, Stirling formed Watchguard International Ltd, formerly with offices in Sloane Street (where the Chelsea Hotel later opened) before moving to South Audley Street in Mayfair.

Business was chiefly with the Gulf States. He was linked, along with Denys Rowley, to a failed attempt to the overthrow Libyan ruler Muammar Gaddafi in 1970 or 1971. Stirling was the founder of private military company KAS International, also known as KAS Enterprises.[6]

Watchguard International Ltd was a private military company, registered in Jersey in 1965 by Stirling and John Woodhouse. Woodhouse's first assignment was to go to Yemen to report on the state of the royalist forces when a cease-fire was declared. At the same time Stirling was cultivating his contacts in the Iranian government and exploring the chances of obtaining work in Africa. The company operated in Zambia and in Sierra Leone, providing training teams and advising on security matters, but its founders' maverick ways of doing business caused its eventual downfall. Woodhouse resigned as Director of Operations after a series of disagreements and Stirling ceased to take an active part in 1972.[7]

Great Britain 75[edit]

In mid-1970s Great Britain, Stirling became increasingly worried that an "undemocratic event" would occur and decided to take action. He created an organisation called Great Britain 75 and recruited members from the aristocratic clubs in Mayfair; mainly ex-military men (often former SAS members). The plan was simple. Should civil unrest result in the breakdown of normal Government operations, they would take over its running. He describes this in detail in an interview from 1974, part of which is present in Adam Curtis's documentary "The Mayfair Set", episode 1: "Who Pays Wins".[5]

In August 1974, before Stirling was ready to go public with GB75, the pacifist magazine Peace News obtained and published his plans, and eventually Stirling – dismayed by the right-wing character of many of those seeking to join GB75 – abandoned the scheme.[citation needed]"

Yours sincerely,


Field McConnell, United States Naval Academy, 1971; Forensic Economist; 30 year airline and 22 year military pilot; 23,000 hours of safety; Tel: 715 307 8222

David Hawkins Tel: 604 542-0891 Forensic Economist; former leader of oil-well blow-out teams; now sponsors Grand Juries in CSI Crime and Safety Investigation

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